The Ickabog by J. K Rowling

The Ickabog

J.K. Rowling

Scholastic Inc., Fiction, Nov. 10, 2020

Pages: 304

Suitable for ages: 8 and up

Themes: Fairy Tale, King, Rumors, Lies, Evil, Monster

Book Jacket Synopsis:

Once upon a time there was a tiny kingdom called Cornucopia, as rich in happiness as it was in gold, and famous for its food. From the delicate cream cheeses of Kurdsburg to the Hopes-of-Heaven pastries of Chouxville, each was so delicious that people wept with joy as they ate them.

But even in this happy kingdom, a monster lurks. Legend tells of a fearsome creature living far to the north in the Marshlands… the Ickabog. Some say it breathes fire, spits poison, and roars through the mist as it carries off wayward sheep and children alike. Some say it’s just a myth…

And when that myth takes on a life of its own, casting a shadow over the kingdom, two children — best friends Bert and Daisy — embark on a great adventure to untangle the truth and find out where the real monster lies, bringing hope and happiness to Cornucopia once more.

Why I like this book:

J.K. Rowling has written a magical story for readers with big imaginations. It’s packed with silly humor, fun wordplay and a grand adventure. Cornucopia appears to be a happy kingdom ruled by King Fred the Fearless, who really is harmless and quite vain. Instead of caring about his people, he’s more interested in the lavish silk clothing he wears. If there is a problem, he’d rather leave ruling to his chief advisors and the evil Lord Spittleworth and his side-kick Flapoon.

There are many loving and honest young characters in the story like Daisy Dovetail and Bert Beamish, who are best friends until a dark cloud begins to move over the kingdom. Daisy’s mother’s is King Fred’s seamstress and dies suddenly finishing a new outfit for the demanding king. Not wanting to be reminded of her death, the king moves Daisy and her father to the outskirts of the kingdom. Then Bert’s father, a Major in the Royal Guard, loses his life in a suspicious accident. The evil Lord Spittleworth says Major Beamish is killed by the monstrous Ickabog. This is where the story takes a turn towards darkness.  Lies are told by Spittleworth, each grander than the first. Imaginations soar and the king and kingdom plummet into fear of the legendary monster living in the Marshlands. But brave Daisy and Bert are suspicious and decide to get to the bottom of things, so they journey to the Marshlands. (No spoilers beyond this paragraph.)

The plot is simple, but filled with twists and turns that will keep readers engaged and guessing what will happen next. There is a narrator that guides the story and gives insight from time to time. The chapters are very short, 4-5 pages, making this fairy tale a perfect bedtime read for children.

The Ickabog reminds me a bit of the fairy tales I read as a child in the late 50s. So it was fun to escape into the happy little kingdom of Cornucopia. Like the stories I read, there is good and evil, and cruel characters.  But I appreciated the strong theme about how rumors start and quickly get out of hand. Lies are told to cover up other lies, and chaos is unleashed. Rowling brilliantly shows how powerful fear and misinformation can be when perpetuated by the rulers of the kingdom. But in the end, the children lead the way.

Make sure you read Rowling’s Forward.  She began writing The Ickabod over 10 years ago. She read chapters to her children, who loved the story. But she set it aside and never finished the book.  When the lockdown hit last year, she completed the book and published chapters online for families to enjoy. She also invited children to participate in a competition and submit full-color illustrations of their favorite scenes from the book. The North American edition contains 34 illustrations from children in the U.S. and Canada.  I listened to a virtual program where the children talked about their delightful artwork and asked Rowling questions.  Make sure you check out the back of the book, where there is are thumbnail pictures along with information about the young artists, who range from 7 to 12.

J.K. Rowling is the author of the seven Harry Potter books, which have sold over 500 million copies, been translated into over 80 languages, and made into eight blockbuster films. She has also written three short companion volumes for charity, including Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them, which later became the inspiration for a new series of films, also written by J. K. Rowling. She then continued Harry’s story as a grown-up in a stage play, Harry Potter and the Cursed Child, which she wrote with playwright Jack Thorne and director John Tiffany. She’s received many awards and honors for her writing. She also supports a number of causes through her charitable trust, Volant, and is the founder of the children’s charity Lumos. She lives in Scotland with her family.

Greg Pattridge hosts Marvelous Middle Grade Monday posts on his wonderful Always in the Middle website. Check out the link to see all of the wonderful reviews by KidLit bloggers and authors.

*Reviewed from a purchased copy.

About Patricia Tiltonhttps://childrensbooksheal.wordpress.comI want "Children's Books Heal" to be a resource for parents, grandparents, teachers and school counselors. My goal is to share books on a wide range of topics that have a healing impact on children who are facing challenges in their lives. If you are looking for good books on grief, autism, visual and hearing impairments, special needs, diversity, bullying, military families and social justice issues, you've come to the right place. I also share books that encourage art, imagination and creativity. I am always searching for those special gems to share with you. If you have a suggestion, please let me know.

14 thoughts on “The Ickabog by J. K Rowling

    • Yes, I listened to a virtual conversation with the children whose illustrations were selected for the book and with Rowling. The kids were so enthusiastic about the story and all had a lot to say about what they liked about the book. They each explained their illustrations and had the opportunity to ask her questions! That’s why I decided to read The Ickabog with that kind of interest. And Rowling said she really enjoyed writing a children’s book again. So it’s possible she may do more.

      Liked by 1 person

  1. It has to be a difficult task to follow up with her previous epic success for kids. Interesting that the idea for Ickabog began 10 years ago. It sounds like she got all the angles right in this fantasy both with the plot and characters. I have this even higher on my TBR list now. Thanks for featuring on MMGM.

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    • She said in an interview that she hadn’t planned on writing anymore children’s books, but her kids loved the story. She polished it off and decided to make it available free to children who were stuck at home with COVID. Then she did the contest. I think it is a win-win for Rowling and for children. Wouldn’t be surprised if she didn’t write another children’s book.

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  2. This sounds like a really well-written and unique story! I honestly didn’t expect that Rowling would ever write another MG book, but I guess I was proven wrong! Thanks for the great review!

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    • Thanks to her kids, it wouldn’t have been published. She read it to them when they were younger and read it to them again. She deleted things that they remembered loving, so she put some things back in. Sounds like a family affair.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. I like old-fashioned fairy tales, and Rowling has such a way of weaving humor and fantasy together. This sounds really good! I also like how it came together during the lock down. I guess this is a silver lining for all of us.

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  4. I love a good fairy tale and hadn’t heard about this book. I am also a big HP fan- so I am adding this to my list! Sounds like a great read and I love that there is lots of humor too! Thanks for putting it on my radar!

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  5. I can’t believe I never heard of this book! Another “must get’ for my grandboys”. The older one, 12, reads a lot. Is this too young for him, or will he enjoy it as well as his younger brothers?

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