They’re So Flamboyant by Michael Genhart

They’re So Flamboyant

Michael Genhart, Author

Tony Neal, Illustrator

Magination Press, Fiction, Oct. 19, 2021

Suitable for ages: 4-8

Themes: Birds, Diversity, Discrimination, Tolerance, Inclusion, Humor

Opening: “When a flamboyance of flamingos flew into the neighborhood…a gaggle of geese gathered to gab.” 

Publisher’s Synopsis:

flam·boy·ant – (of a person—or bird!—or their behavior) tending to attract attention because of their confidence, exuberance, and stylishness

This fun and funny bird’s-eye tome to individuality, community, and harmony follows the reactions of a neighborhood full of birds when a “flamboyance” of flamingos moves in. Each band of birds—a gaggle of geese, a dole of doves, a charm of finches, a brood of chickens, a scream of swifts, and an unkindness of ravens—all have their feathers ruffled and express their apprehension about the new and different arrivals. Bright pink colors, long legs, how dare they!

Even a watch of nightingales patrols after dark. When the band of jays decides it is time to settle down the neighborhood, the pride of peacocks takes the lead, with support from a waddle of penguins, a venue of vultures, a mob of emus, and a gulp of cormorants.

Finally, they all land at the flamingos’ welcome party only to realize that they had all been birdbrained. Their new neighbors are actually quite charming, and not so scary and different after all. 

Why I love this book:

Michael Genhart has written a hilarious and clever picture book that will help children learn about accepting others, avoiding stereotypes and assumptions, and being friendly to new classroom members and neighbors. Genhart’s text is brilliant with entertaining wordplay and alliteration. Each bird group responds with “bubble” comments that exaggerates the gossiping. Some of my favorites: “Flamingos? Really? In our backyard?”…”Well, there goes the neighborhood!”…”Our peace has been totally disrupted!”…”They’re so pink!”…”Stay in your own neighborhood! Gawk!”  But the flamingos remain pretty, pink and proud! And what a surprise there will be when the other birds are ready to take on the flamingos. 

Tony Neal’s expressive and funny illustrations are delightful! They really make this story sing!

Make sure you check out Genhart’s Sampling of Bird Groups at the end of the book. Readers will also have fun with the list of birds and their associated collective nouns. For example: Crows (murder, congress, horde, muster, cauldron); Pelicans (squadron, pod, scoop);  and Turkeys (rafter, gobble, gang, posse.) Another fun class activity.

Resources: There are so many wonderful ways to use this book in the classroom. Make sure you check out the Note to Readers at the end. The author suggests that teachers and parents start with age-appropriate conversations about diversity, differences, and discriminating behaviors like race, ethnicity, religion, age, disability, sexual orientation and body types. Ask children to list the hurtful things that they see and hear at their own school. What causes kids to hurt others — are they afraid? This is such a great way to talk about exclusion and inclusion with children.   

Michael Genhart, PhD, is a licensed clinical psychologist in private practice in San Francisco. He has also written Rainbow; Cake & I Scream!; Mac & Geeez!; Peanut Butter & Jellyous: Ouch! Moments: I See You: So Many Smarts!; and Accordionly. He lives with his family in Marin County, California. Visit Genhart at his website, @MJGenhart on FB, @MGenhart on Twitter and @MichaelGenhart on Instagram.

Every Friday, authors and KidLit bloggers post a favorite picture book. To see a complete listing of all the Perfect Picture Books (PPB) with resources, please visit author Susanna Leonard Hill’s website.

*Review copy provided by Magination Press in exchange for a review.

Daughter of the Deep by Rick Riordan

Daughter of the Deep

Rick Riordan, Author

Disney – Hyperion, Fiction, Oct. 26, 2021

Suitable for ages: 10-14

Themes: Adventure, Underwater exploration, Marine sciences, High schools, Orphans, East Indian Americans

Publisher’s Synopsis:

Ana Dakkar is a freshman at Harding-Pencroft Academy, a five-year high school that graduates the best marine scientists, naval warriors, navigators, and underwater explorers in the world. Ana’s parents died while on a scientific expedition two years ago, and the only family’s she’s got left is her older brother, Dev, also a student at HP. (And they’ve heard all the Harry Potter jokes already, so don’t go there.)

Ana’s freshman year culminates with the class’s weekend trial at sea, the details of which have been kept secret. She only hopes she has what it’ll take to succeed. All her worries are blown out of the water when, on the bus ride to the ship, Ana and her schoolmates witness a terrible tragedy that will change the trajectory of their lives.

But wait, there’s more. The professor accompanying them informs Ana that their rival school, Land Institute, and Harding-Pencroft have been fighting a cold war for a hundred and fifty years. Now that cold war has been turned up to a full broil, and the freshman are in danger of becoming fish food.

In a race against deadly enemies, Ana will make amazing friends and astounding discoveries about her heritage as she puts her leadership skills to the test for the first time.

What I love about this book: I am only going to leave bullet comments, because I know this book will be a popular gift for many teens over the holidays. So, no spoilers! 

Rick Riordan has captured my heart with Daughter of the Deep. The brilliantly crafted novel is action-packed, fast-paced, and full of unexpected surprises, right from the start. His storytelling is magnificent. And take a good look at that stunning book cover!

Daughter of the Deep is inspired by Jules Vern’s 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea. I believe fans of Vern will find this modern take a thrilling read with a new spin on Captain Nemo and his submarine the Nautilus. Riordan takes world-building to another level. And the believer in me sees the potential for a  series. 

Riordan has created a cast of characters who are complicated, original and represent a wide range of ethnicities, faiths and abilities. Ana Dakkar is very relatable, believable and will capture reader’s hearts. She’s thrown into a situation she didn’t ask for. But her courage shines in the face of what she faces on an emotional level. She quickly gains the respect of the other students, and has a strong team of friends in Nelinha, Ester, Gem and many other HP students. And I love Jupiter the orangutan chef who communicates through sign language. He adds some humor and lightness to the story. First time I’ve seen attention given to menstrual cramps in novel.      

This high-stakes undersea adventure, re-imagines technologies so far advanced that readers will keep turning pages. STEM students will especially love this book — especially those who dream of about the world beneath the ocean and the advanced technologies of the future. But readers will also be challenged to think about the caution required in using them. Who do these advanced technologies belong to and how will they be used for the good of all mankind and nature? Which makes this a perfect discussion book.

Rick Riordan, dubbed “storyteller of the gods” by Publishers Weekly, is the author of five New York Times #1 best-selling middle grade series with millions of copies sold throughout the world: Percy Jackson and the Olympians, the Heroes of Olympus, and the Trials of Apollo, based on Greek and Roman mythology; the Kane Chronicles, based on ancient Egyptian mythology; and Magnus Chase and the Gods of Asgard, based on Norse mythology. Rick collaborated with illustrator John Rocco on two New York Times #1 best-selling collections of Greek myths for the whole family: Percy Jackson’s Greek Gods and Percy Jackson’s Greek Heroes. He is also the publisher of an imprint at Disney Hyperion, Rick Riordan Presents, dedicated to finding other authors of highly entertaining fiction based on world cultures and mythologies, and a contributor to an RRP short story anthology, The Cursed Carnival and Other Calamities. He lives in Boston, Massachusetts, with his wife and two sons. He’s even known to go scuba diving on occasion. Rick’s Twitter handle is @RickRiordan.

Greg Pattridge hosts Marvelous Middle Grade Monday posts on his wonderful Always in the Middle website. Check out the link to see all of the wonderful reviews by KidLit bloggers and authors.

*Reviewed from a library copy.

What Boys Do by Jon Lasser

What Boys Do

Jon Lasser, Author

Robert Paul Jr., Illustrator

Magination Press,  Fiction, Nov. 9, 2021

Suitable for ages: 4-8

Themes: Boys, Embracing individuality, Diversity, Self-esteem, Kindness, Friendships, Rhyme

Opening “There are many ways to be a boy, and so many more ways to be you!”

Book Jacket Synopsis:

What exactly do boys do?

The answer is ANYTHING and EVERYTHING!

From eating to dreaming, making mistakes to exploring, to hurting and loving, there is more to being a boy than meets the eye.

In this fun, affirming book that holds no restraints to traditional norms about what it means to be a boy, readers will rejoice at all of the possibilities.

Why I like this book:

Jon Lasser’s inspiring book celebrates boyhood and encourages boys to embrace all the many things that make them each unique.  Readers will meet boys who love to create, explore, try new things, ask questions, share feelings, team-up with others, pursue dreams and do things they’ve never tried. It’s all about letting go and being themselves.

The rhyming is exceptional, with each sequence ending in a question to readers. What a clever way to encourage discussion on every page. “Do you share a story or something to eat? / Notice your feelings when you gather and meet?” Do they listen to others? Are they kind? Can they overcome hardships. Are they okay with being different? Are they making a difference in their world? This is definitely a read aloud.

This is book speaks to boys, but Robert Paul’s illustrations are inclusive and represent all kinds of kids — even girls. His large expressive and vibrant illustrations include a diverse cast of characters representing different cultures and those who are differently abled. And look at that spectacular cover!

Resources: This book is a resource and will spark many interesting discussions at home and in the classroom. Make sure you check out the Reader’s Note at the end which includes information on how gender role stereotypes can be harmful to boys and how parents and teachers can “support healthy emotional development in boys by supporting their personhood rather than a more narrowly defined boyhood.”

Jon Laser is a school psychologist and professor at Texas State University in San Marcos. Jon is the co-author of Grow Happy, Grow Grateful, and Grow Kind. He lives in Martindale, Texas. Visit him @JonSLasser on Twitter.

Every Friday, authors and KidLit bloggers post a favorite picture book. To see a complete listing of all the Perfect Picture Books (PPB) with resources, please visit author Susanna Leonard Hill’s website.

*Review copy provided by the Magination Press in exchange for a review.

Blossom and Bud by Frank J. Sileo

Blossom and Bud

Frank J. Sileo, Author

Brittany E. Lakin, Illustrator

Magination Press, Fiction, Apr. 13, 2021

Suitable for ages: 4-8

Themes: Flowers, Self-esteem, Individuality, Body Image, Diversity 

Opening: “Blossom and Bud live in Mr. Baxter’s Flower Shop…”

Synopsis:

Blossom and Bud live in Mr. Baxter’s flower shop among beautiful plants of every imaginable size, color and shape.  Blossom is tall and tries to hide her height. Bud doesn’t like how short he is and  tries to force his flower to grow and bloom. The other flowers in the shop tease them. But Mr. Baxter thinks they are just right as they are. In fact he has a special role for each of them.

Why I like this book:

Blossom and Bud encourages children love themselves and respect others. Beauty comes in all shapes, sizes and colors. It doesn’t matter what color your skin is, how tall/short you are, or whether you are are thin or stalky. Everyone’s body is different and should be celebrated. Society places so much pressure on appearance that self-esteem issues and teasing is inevitable. That’s why I love stories like this one, because it helps kids build self-esteem and treat others with kindness. Brittany E. Lakin’s illustrations are cheery and colorful and really set the mood for the book. Frank J. Sileo’s book is a winner and I’m happy to recommend it to parents and teacher.  

Resources: This story encourages open discussions at home and school. There is a Note to Adult Florists at the end that will help teachers and parents nurture and discuss healthy body image with children. Ask children to imagine what kind of flower or plant they would like to be and to draw a picture.     

Frank J. Sileo, PhD., is a New Jersey licensed psychologist and the founder and executive director of The Center for Psychological Enhancement in Ridgewood, NJ. He is the author of 11 award-winning children’s books that include:  Bentley the bee, Bee Still: An Invitation to Meditation, Be Heartful: Spread Loving Kindness, and Bee Calm: The Buzz on Yoga, as well as Snitchy Witch, Did You Hear? A Story about Gossip, A World of Pausabilities: An Exercise in Mindfulness, Don’t Put Yourself Down in Circus Town: A Story about Self-Confidence, and Sally Sore Loser: A Story About Winning and Losing.

Every Friday, authors and KidLit bloggers post a favorite picture book. To see a complete listing of all the Perfect Picture Books (PPB) with resources, please visit author Susanna Leonard Hill’s website.
 
*Review copy provided by Magination Press in exchange for a review.

Baby Blue by Judi Abbot

Baby Blue

Judi Abbot, author/illustrator

Magination Press, Feb. 9, 2021

Suitable for ages: 3-6

Themes: Children, Color, Curiosity, Diversity, Emotions, Friendship

Publisher’s Synopsis:

Baby Blue lives in a blue world— everything is blue, from the trees, to the flowers, to the animals. When he accidentally tears a hole and a strange light pours in, he can see someone that isn’t blue—another little person like him, only they are yellow. Scared but curious, he overcomes his fear and introduces himself to Baby Yellow. With his new friend, he realizes that the world is full of new and wonderful things to discover. This sweet story encourages children to conquer their fear of the unknown and take a chance on new and different things.

Why I like this book:

Judi Abbot has written and illustrated a beautiful book for young children about being curious and brave as they explore their surroundings. Her use of color has many meanings in the book. First of all it is a way to teach little one colors. It also shows how curious little kids are and how scary it can be to meet someone new —  especially if they look different. Baby Blue doesn’t know what to do when he meets Baby Yellow, Baby Green and so on. I love how Abbot tackles diversity through her colorful artwork.  Abbot’s text is spare for young children and her illustrations are filled with colorful shapes that are simply gorgeous and will keep kids turning the pages!  

This book is the perfect gift book for new parents and toddler birthdays! It is a welcome addition to any home or school library because it introduces children to the many new and beautiful people they will meet as they begin preschool and school.

Resources: Encourage kids to name the colors.  Give them crayons and ask them to draw a picture of themselves, a friend or a favorite pet in any color they wish.

Judi (Giuditta) Abbot went to art school in Italy. She is the author/illustrator of I Am, We Are Family, Snow Kissess, I Love you, Baby, Hugs and Kisses, and My Grandparents Love Me.  She has illustrated many more and many of her  published books have been translated around the world. Judi’s highly recognizable style features simple shapes and bright colors rendered in acrylics, colored pencils, and digitally. She lives in London, UK. Visit Abbot’s website and visit her on Facebook @judiabbotbooks and on Instagram @judiabbot.

Every Friday, authors and KidLit bloggers post a favorite picture book. To see a complete listing of all the Perfect Picture Books (PPB) with resources, please visit The Pig War: How a Porcine Tragedy Taught England and America to Shareauthor Susanna Leonard Hill’s website.

*Review copy provided by Magination Press in exchange for a review.

No Voice Too Small: Fourteen Young American Making History

No Voice Too Small: 14 Young Americans Making History

Lindsay H. Metcalf and Keila V. Dawson, Editors

Jeanette Bradley, Editor/Illustrator

Charlesbridge, Nonfiction, Sep. 22, 2020

Suitable for ages: 6 – 11

Themes: Youth activism, Making a difference, Bullying, Clean Water, Climate Change, Gun Violence, Poetry

Publisher’s Synopsis:

“You’re never too young or too small to change the world.” – Mari Copeny

This all-star anthology covers fourteen youth activists calling for change and fighting for justice across the United States. These change-makers represent a wide range of life experiences and causes, including racial justice, clean water, LGBTQ+ rights, mental health, and more, Beautifully illustrated poems by #ownvoices authors, plus secondary text, spotlight the efforts and achievements of such luminaries as Marley Dias, Jazz Jennings, and Mari Copeny, “Make Some Noise” tips will inspire readers to take concrete action for change, Back matter includes more information on the poetic forms used in the book.

Why I like this book:

No Voice Too Small will inspire and empower young readers, parents and teachers. This is my favorite kind of book to share with readers because there is an urgency among young people who see the injustice around them, are concerned that adults aren’t doing enough, and want to take action to improve their communities, country and world. They are brave and working for the rights of children in a peaceful manner.

Readers will hear from Nza-Ari Khepra, 16, who loses a friend to gun violence in Chicago and launches Project Orange Tree, which grows into the National Gun Violence Awareness Day celebrated every June. Meet Ziad Ahmed,14, who is treated unfairly in high school because he’s Muslim, and creates an online platform where students can share their stories and stop hate. Levi Draheim, 8, fears the loss of his Florida home to rising seas and joins 21 kids who sue the US government for failing to act on climate change. Jasilyn Charger, 19, protests the construction of a pipeline that threatens to leak oil into the Missouri River that provide water for Standing Rock Sioux Tribe and many other people living downstream.

The book is beautifully designed. The #own voices authors and editors, Lindsay H. Metcalf and Keila V. Dawson, capture each child’s captivating story in an attractive double-page spread. The left side of every spread features a soulful poem with warm and appealing illustrations of each child by Jeanette Bradley. The text about the young person’s contribution is featured on the right, along with additional artwork by Bradley. Read their stories and you will be inspired.

Resources: The book is a resource for students to use in the classroom.  At the end of the book there is a section about each of the 14 poets who participated and a page of the poetry form used. This book will spark many lively discussions and encourage young people to identify a problem and think about what they may do alone or together to create change and improve their community, country and world.  What will you do?

Lindsay H. Metcalf is the author of Farmers Unite! Planting a Protest for Fair Prices. She has also been a reporter, editor, and columnist for the Kansas City Star and other news outlets.

Keila V. Dawson has been a community organizer and an early childhood special education teacher. She is the author of The King Cake Baby. 

Jeanette Bradley has been an urban planner, an apprentice pastry chef, and the artist-in­-residence for a traveling art museum on a train. She is the author and illustrator of Love, Mama.

Greg Pattridge hosts Marvelous Middle Grade Monday posts on his wonderful Always in the Middle website. Check out the MMGM link to see all of the wonderful reviews by KidLit bloggers and authors.

*Review copy provided by the editors in exchange for a review.

Bunheads by Misty Copeland

Bunheads

Misty Copeland, Author

Setor Fiadzigbey, Illustrator

G.P. Putnam’s Sons, Fiction, Sep. 29,  2020

Suitable for ages: 5-8

Themes: Misty Copeland, Ballet dancing, Coppélia, Inspirational, Diversity

Opening: “When Miss Bradley announced they’d be performing the ballet Coppélia “Co-pay-lee-ah,” for the recital, everyone in Misty’s class shouted excitedly and gathered around to hear their teacher tell the story of Coppélia.”

Synopsis:

From prima ballerina and New York Times bestselling author Misty Copeland comes the story of a young Misty, who discovers her love of dance through the ballet Coppélia–a story about a toymaker who devises a villainous plan to bring a doll to life.

Misty is so captivated by the tale and its heroine, Swanilda, she decides to audition for the role. But she’s never danced ballet before; in fact, this is the very first day of her very first dance class!

Though Misty is excited, she’s also nervous. But as she learns from her fellow bunheads, she makes wonderful friends who encourage her to do her very best. Misty’s nerves quickly fall away, and with a little teamwork, the bunheads put on a show to remember.

Featuring the stunning artwork of newcomer Setor Fiadzigbey, Bunheads is an inspiring tale for anyone looking for the courage to try something new.

Why I like this book:

A magical and inclusive tale, Misty Copeland’s childhood story will undoubtedly inspire a new generation of young aspiring dancers. Misty falls in love with dance at her first ballet class, when Miss Bradley tells the story of a lonely toymaker who makes a beautiful life-size doll named Coppélia. She is so lovely that a boy falls in love with her and the toymaker hopes that love may bring the the doll to life. Misty is mesmerized by the ballet.

Misty is a natural talent and eagerly practices the positions and movements with her class. She quickly picks up the steps, not realizing that Miss Bradley is watching her graceful movements. The teacher pairs Misty with Cat, a very talented dancer who shows her the dance of Coppélia. The two girls become best friends and learn from each other as they continue to dance together. During the auditions Cat wins the lead role Coppélia and Misty wins the part of Swanilda. As they rehearse their roles, they inspire each other.

Setor Fiadzigbey’s illustrations are stunning. He beautifully captures the joy, energy, and strength of the dancers, and the thrilling emotion and spirit of the ballet performance. This is a perfect gift book and a thrilling read for girls who dream of dancing.

Resources: If you your child hasn’t seen a ballet, take them to a live performance like The Nutcracker.  But with the many COVID restrictions, you can view many Misty Copeland videos on Youtube.

Misty Copeland made history in 2015 when she was the first black woman to be promoted to principal dancer at the American Ballet Theatre, one of the most prominent classical ballet companies in the world. She is also the author of the award-winning picture book Firebird. You may visit Misty Copeland online.

Every Friday, authors and KidLit bloggers post a favorite picture book. To see a complete listing of all the Perfect Picture Books (PPB) with resources, please visit author Susanna Leonard Hill’s website.

*Reviewed from a library book.

A Girl Like You by Frank Murphy and Carla Murphy

A Girl Like You

Frank Murphy and Carla Murphy, Authors

Kayla Harren, Illustrator

Sleeping Bear Press, Fiction, Jul. 15, 2020

Suitable for ages: 4-8

Themes: Girls, Embracing individuality, Diversity, Self-esteem, Self-confidence, Friendships

Opening: There are billions and billions and billions of people in the world. But you are the only YOU there is!

Book Jacket Synopsis:

Every girl is a wonder! A Girl Like You encourages girls to embrace what makes them unique, to choose kindness, and to be their own advocates. In an age when girls know they can be whatever the want, this book reminds them of all the ways to be beautifully, brilliantly, and uniquely themselves.

Why I like this book:

Frank and Carla Murphy’s magnificent book celebrates girlhood and encourages girls to discover the unique individuals that they are. Readers will meet girls who are brave enough to try new things and not be afraid of failing; girls who pursue their big dreams;  girls who share their thoughts and opinions with others; and girls who have empathy, listen, and are kind to friends in trouble. The messages throughout are beautiful.

This is not just a book for girls. It is also a book that mother and daughter will want to share together. In fact I have adult friends who would benefit from the many beautiful reminders of who girls/women really are. This is a perfect gift book.

Kayla Harren’s endearing and vibrant illustrations show a wide-range of diversity among the characters. I was delighted to see an illustration of a girl with Vitiligo, a skin pigment disorder. Kudos to the illustrator for making the characters inclusive. The end pages are also fun!

Resources: This book will spark many interesting discussions at home and in the classroom. With older girls, encourage them to make a list about the things they like about themselves or write a short story or poem about how they are special. With younger girls have them draw a picture.  This book pairs beautifully with Frank Murphy’s A Boy Like You, so both could be used together in a classroom setting.

Frank Murphy is a teacher who writes and a writer who teaches. After writing A Boy Like You, he wanted to write this book, but knew he couldn’t do it without the help of his best friend and wife, Carla Murphy, who is a pediatric nurse who has been helping kids get better for more than 15 years. This is her first book.  They live in near Philadelphia, with a daughter and their two dogs.

Every Friday, authors and KidLit bloggers post a favorite picture book. To see a complete listing of all the Perfect Picture Books (PPB) with resources, please visit author Susanna Leonard Hill’s website.

*Reviewed from a library copy.

The Arabic Quilt: An Immigrant Story by Aya Khalil

The Arabic Quilt: An Immigrant Story

Aya Khalil, Author

Anait Semirdzhyan, Illustrator

Tilbury House Publishers, Fiction, Feb. 18, 2020

Suitable for ages: 6-8

Themes: Quilt, Immigration, Egypt, Bilingual, School, Prejudice, Inclusion, Diversity, Friendship

Opening: “Kanzi, habibti, your’e going to be late to the first day of school,” Mama calls.

Book Jacket Synopsis:

Kanzi’s family has moved from Egypt to America, and she wants very much to fit in. Maybe that’s why on her first day in her new school, she forgets to take the kofta sandwich her mother has made for her lunch, but that backfires when Mama shows up at school with the sandwich. Mama wears a hijab and calls her daughter Habibti (dear one). When she leaves, the teasing starts.

That night, Kanzi wraps herself in the beautiful Arabic quilt her teita (grandma) in Cairo gave her. She writes a poem about her beloved quilt. It smells like Teita’s home in Cairo, and that comforts Kanzi. What she doesn’t know yet is that the quilt will help her make new friends.

Why I like this book:

The Arabic Quilt is a compassionate and feel-good book for immigrant children who are bilingual and starting a new school. They want so badly to fit in with and be accepted by the other children, even though they may dress a little differently and bring an ethnic lunch from home.

Kanzi’s teacher handles a difficult situation with such creativity. Kanzi writes a poem about her Arabic quilt and shares it with her teacher. The teacher asks Kanzi to bring her quilt to share with the other students. They think it’s cool and want to make a classroom quilt. The teacher invites Kanzi’s mom to teach the students how to write their names in Arabic for their quilt squares. Completed, the quilt is hung on the wall outside the classroom.

I love that this celebratory story of cultural traditions, acceptance, and inclusion is based on the author’s own childhood experiences, after immigrating to the US from Egypt. I don’t want to spoil the ending, but it will put a smile on your face.

Anait Semirdzhyan’s lively and expressive illustrations are beautiful and full of details. Make sure you check out the Arabic names on the quilt.

Resources: This is an excellent classroom or school project that will help unite kids of all cultures.  Make sure you check out the Glossary of Arabic Words at the end with Arabic letters and English words derived from Arabic, like zero, algebra, candy, sugar and coffee.

Every Friday, authors and KidLit bloggers post a favorite picture book. To see a complete listing of all the Perfect Picture Books (PPB) with resources, please visit author Susanna Leonard Hill’s website.

*Reviewed from a library copy.

Most Likely by Sarah Watson

Most Likely

Sarah Watson, Author

Little, Brown and Company, Fiction,  Mar. 10, 2020

Suitable for ages: 12 and up

Themes: Best friends, Friendship, High School, Diversity, LGBT, Romance,  Mental Illness, President

Synopsis:

Four best friends. One future President. Who Will it be?

Ava, CJ, Jordan, and Martha (listed in alphabetical order out of fairness, of course) have been friends since kindergarten. Now they’re high school seniors, facing their biggest fears about growing up and growing apart. More than just college is on the horizon, though. One of these girls is destined to become the president of the United States.

But which one?

Is it Ava, the picture-perfect artist who’s secretly struggling to figure out where she belongs? Or could it be CJ, the one who’s got everything figured out…except how to fix her terrible SAT scores? Maybe it’s Jordan, the group’s resident journalist, who knows she’s ready for more than their small Ohio town can offer. And don’t overlook Martha, who will have to make it through all the obstacles that stand in the way of her dreams.

From Sarah Watson, the creator of the hit TV show The Bold Type, comes the story of four best friends who have one another’s backs through every new love, breakup, stumble, and triumph — proving that great friendships can help young women achieve anything…happiness, strength, success, even a seat in the Oval Office.

Why I like this book:

Most Likey is a timely, empowering and suspenseful political novel for teens and young adults. The story’s heart is rooted in strong female friendships and self-discovery that make this story soar. Sarah Watson’s writing is uplifting and her novel is the perfect summer escape!

Th narrative is written in third person with each chapter rotating four different viewpoints. It held me back a bit because I couldn’t keep the details of each of the teens lives straight until I reached the half-way point. By then I was hooked and I couldn’t put the book down.

The character-driven plot weaves together the realistic and complicated lives of the four seniors who are ethnically diverse and from different socioeconomic backgrounds. They tackle a variety of issues in their lives, ranging from depression, adoption, fears of not being good enough, sexual orientation, divorce and concerns about being able to afford college. And they have a male friend, Logan Diffenderfer, who has a unique relationship with each of the besties. Although Logan is not the story, he is a grounding force for the four teens.

The Prologue gives readers a peek into the future — Washington DC on Jan. 20, 2049, the day of the presidential innaugeration. Readers are only given one clue. The president-elects last name is Diffenderfer. The actual story is set in 2019 -2020 in Cleveland, Ohio, with the seniors focused on grades, relationships, work, SAT scores, college applications, loans and community service.  The Epilogue fast forwards to the innaugeration day, the big reveal and a satisfying ending about the other three  best friends, who are all present.  Sorry. I can’t give anything away.

Sarah Watson is the creator of the hit TV series The Bold Type (on Freeform), which the New York Times described as “Sex and the Single Girl for millennials.” Previously she was a writer and executive producer of the critically acclaimed NBC drama Parenthood. She lives in Santa Monica, California. Most Likely is her debut novel.

Greg Pattridge hosts Marvelous Middle Grade Monday posts on his wonderful Always in the Middle website. Check out the MMGM link to see all of the wonderful reviews by KidLit bloggers and authors.

*Reviewed from a library copy.