Dangerous Wildfires by Lola Schaefer – PPBF

Dangerous Wildfires: Part of the Lightning Bolt Book Collection

Lola Schaefer, Author

Photographs: Acknowledgments of contributors at the end of the book

Lerner Publications, Nonfiction,  Jan. 1, 2022

Suitable for ages: 6 – 9

Themes: Wildfires, Climate Change, Danger, Staying Safe 

Opening: “Lightning strikes dry grass. The wind blows and sparks fly. A fire begins.”

Publisher’s Synopsis:

Climate change is making wildfires worse, and it’s important to know how to stay safe. Read about what causes a fire, what makes it grow, and what happens when fire makes people leave their homes.

A spark from a lightning strike or a campfire can quickly grow into a wildfire covering acres. Learn about the types of wildfires, how climate change increases the danger, and how to stay safe. Plus hear from a wildfire survivor!

Why I like this book:

Many readers live in areas where wildfires reek havoc in the forests around them.  Sadly, wildfires are becoming part of their lives. And if they aren’t personally impacted they see the wildfires reported on the daily news.

This book is age appropriate for emerging readers, 6-9. It is beautifully designed so that readers will enjoy the simple text — four chapters that explain what happens, gives important facts, answers many of their questions, and includes  amazing photographs on each page that showcase wildfires from beginning to end. Each photo has a brief insert that points to what the text explains. Readers will be surprised to learn that wildfires can do some good.  

This book is part of a larger series, the Earth in Danger — part of the Lightning Bolt Books collection.. Some of the other titles include: Dangerous Blizzards, Dangerous Droughts, Dangerous Earthquakes, Dangerous Floods, Dangerous Hurricanes, Dangerous Tornadoes, and Dangerous Volcanoes. Sadly enough, we are dealing with all of these dangers every year.

These books belong in every elementary school library. They are perfect go-to books that can be used in the classroom or used by kids for reports.

Resources: The book is a resource and will lead to many important discussions at home and school.  If you live in areas where wildfires begin, put together a safety kit for home or school (instructions in the book).

You may want to check out the Smokey the Bear Link for kids and educators. Sign up to be a Smokey’s Scout and explore the fun activities.   

Lola Schaefer is a professional author, teacher and public speaker. She has published more than 275 books in the past 25 years with trade, school/library, and classroom publishers. She is a writing consultant in elementary and middle schools, as well as a frequent presenter at writing conferences and workshops. She lives and works in Georgia.

Every Friday, authors and KidLit bloggers post a favorite picture book. To see a complete listing of all the Perfect Picture Books (PPB) with resources, please visit author Susanna Leonard Hill’s website.

*Reviewed from a library copy.

 

 

 

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I’ll Go and Come Back by Rajani LaRocca- PPBF

I’ll Go and Come Back

Rajani La Rocca, Author

Sara Palacios, Illustrator

Candlewick Press, Fiction, Mar. 29, 2022

Suitable for ages: 3-7

Themes: Intergenerational relationships, India, Travel, Culture, Communications, Multicultural

Opening: “For the first time since I was a baby, I flew across the world to see aunties and uncles, cousin-brothers and cousin-sisters, and Sita Pati.”

Book Jacket Synopsis:

When Jyoti visits her grandmother halfway around the world, she is overwhelmed by the differences between India and home. At first she feels lonely and out of place, but soon, despite a language barrier, she and Sita Pati are able to understand each other. They form a bond as they look at books together, make designs with colored sand, shop at the market, play games, eat chapatis, and sip warm milk with saffron to bring sweet dreams. When it’s time to part, Jyoti doesn’t want to leave, but then she remembers that in Tamil, people don’t say goodbye, they say “I’ll go and come back.”

Sure enough, the two reunite the next summer when Pati visits Jyoti in America, and it’s Jyoti’s turn to make her grandmother feel welcome. Can they create some special memories that will last until the next time they see each other?

Why I like this book:

This book melts my heart on many levels. For starters, I love sweet grandchild/grandparent relationships. Despite the language barrier, readers will enjoy watching the loving bond between Jyoti and Sita Pati. Sometimes love speaks more loudly than words, as Rajani La Rocca demonstrates through her sweet and simple narrative. “I’ll go and come back,” is such a reassuring custom for all children who have grandparents living living miles away. And Sara Palacios vibrant and expressive illustrations highlight their special bond in a cheerful way. 

I also am drawn to this story because our adopted Indian son speaks Tamil. The story also reminds me of my earliest conversations with him. He learned English much more rapidly than we learned Tamil words. But like Jyoti, we communicated as we introduced him to his new life and community. Sometimes words aren’t needed. 

Resources: Do you have your own tradition with grandparents that live far away? Share how you stay connected. Create your own tradition.

Rajani La Rocca was born in Bangalore, India, and immigrated to the United States when she was a baby. She grew up in Louisville, Kentucky, graduated from Harvard with both a BA and and MD and has worked as a primary care physician since 2001. She is the author of several books for young readers. Rajani LaRocca lives in eastern Massachusetts with her family.

Every Friday, authors and KidLit bloggers post a favorite picture book. To see a complete listing of all the Perfect Picture Books (PPB) with resources, please visit author Susanna Leonard Hill’s website.

*Review copy provided by Candlewick in exchange for a review.

 

Listen by Gabi Snyder — PPBF Review

Listen

Gabi Snyder, Author

Stephanie Graegin, Illustrator

A Paula Wiseman Book, Fiction, 2021

Suitable for ages: 4-8

Themes: Listening, Paying attention, City, Sounds, Noise

Opening: When you step out into the big, wild world, sometimes all you hear is… NOISE!

Publisher’s Synopsis:

Isn’t the world a noisy place?

BEEP! WOOF! VROOM!

But what if you stop, close your eyes and Listen?

Can you hear each sound?

Can you listen past the noise and hear the quiet, too?

Why I like Listen:

A girl walks to school with her father and is bombarded with the noises of her busy city — dogs barking, cars beeping, motorcycles vrooming, and crows cawing. Readers will join the girl as she stops and attentively listens to each sound and lets go of the noise around it. She begins to learn what’s beyond the sounds — joy, hurtful feelings, the sounds of nature, and silence. She discovers that there is so much more “waiting to be heard” if she quiets herself and just listens.

The text is noisy with fun sounds that readers will enjoy repeating. Stephanie Graegin’s illustrations are beautiful and guide you on the girl’s journey. It is a beautiful story about mindfulness and learning to live in the present moment.

Resources: There is more information about LISTENING at the end of the book, which will encourage many interesting discussions.  Listening is more than just hearing.  It is a skill that will help readers learn to focus and tune out the noise. It is also a good book for parents. Teachers, check out the curriculum guide from Simon and Schuster.

Gabi Snyder’s debut picture book, Two Dogs on a Trike, received a starred review from Kirkus Reviews, who said it “perfectly captures the rollicking, manic joy of dogs off the leash.” She studied psychology at University of Washington and creative writing at University of Texas at Austin and is a member of SCBWI. When she’s not writing, she love taking nature walks, visiting Free Libraries, and baking sweet treats. She lives in Oregon with her family. Learn more at her website.

Every Friday, authors and KidLit bloggers post a favorite picture book. To see a complete listing of all the Perfect Picture Books (PPB) with resources, please visit author Susanna Leonard Hill’s website.

*Reviewed from a library copy.

 

Lupe Lopez: Rock Star Rules! PPFB Review

Lupe Lopez: Rock Star Rules!

e.E. Charlton-Trujillo and Pat Zietlow Miller, Authors

Joe Cepeda, Illustrator

Candlewick Press, Fiction, Jun. 28, 2022 

Spanish Edition Available: Lupe Lopez: Reglas de una estrella de rock

Suitable for ages: 4-8

Themes: Kindergarten, Rules, Being true to yourself, Latino

Opening: “Lupe Lopez had big plans for the first day of kindergarten. And now, she was a real-life, Texas-size rock star. As anyone could see.”

Publisher’s Synopsis:

When a sassy drummer starts kindergarten, the rules of school cramp her style. What’s a young rock star to do?
When Lupe Lopez struts through the doors of Hector P. Garcia Elementary in sunglasses with two taped-up Number 2 pencils—drumsticks, of course—poking from her pocket, her confidence is off the charts. All day, Lupe drums on desks, tables, and chairs while Ms. Quintanilla reminds her of school rules.

Lupe has her own rules: 1) Don’t listen to anyone. 2) Make lots of noise. ¡Rataplán! 3) Have fans, not friends. But with her new teacher less than star struck, and fans hard to come by, Lupe wonders if having friends is such a bad idea after all. Can it be that true star power means knowing when to share the spotlight? 

Why I like Lupe Lopez:

What a unique and energetic story about a Latino girl entering Kindergarten. She’s full of self-confidence and ready to “rock” her first day at school. The illustrations are lively and expressive. The spare text is peppered with many Spanish words and onomatopoeia about drumbeats. A lot of fun action packed into this story. There is also a Spanish edition. Great collaboration between e. E. Charlton-Trujillo and Pat Zietlow Miller and Joe Cepeda! 

I believe kids love quirky and mischievous characters who stand out and dare to push boundaries — especially at school. Read at the beginning of the school year, this story will lend itself to many interesting discussions.  It’s also a story about learning to adjust to school, following new rules and not losing yourself.  Great ending!

Resources:  Ask children if they have a rock star hidden inside them, and if so what form does it take (athlete, musician, inventor, superhero, astronaut etc)?  Have them draw a picture of their own inner rock star.   

e.E. Charlton-Tujillo is a Mexican American filmmaker, youth literacy activist, and author of several books for teens, most notably the award-winning young-adult novel Fat Angie and its sequels, Fat Angie: Rebel Girl Revolution and Fat Angie: Homecoming. Lupe Lopez is his first picture book and “embodies not only his childhood but also the rock star in all of us.” They live in California. 

Pat Zietlow Miller is the author of the New York Times best-selling Be KindMy Brother the Duckand other books for young readers. About Lupe Lopez: “I was the rule follower in kindergarten.” She lives in Madison, Wisconsin.

Every Friday, authors and KidLit bloggers post a favorite picture book. To see a complete listing of all the Perfect Picture Books (PPB) with resources, please visit author Susanna Leonard Hill’s website.

*Reviewed from a library copy. 

 

Who Are Your People? by Bakari Sellers

Who Are Your People?

Bakari Sellers, Author

Reggie Brown, Illustrator

Quill Tree Books, Fiction, Jan. 11, 2022

Suitable for ages: 4-9

Themes:  African Americans, Family, Ancestors, Pride, Community, Dreams

Opening: When you meet someone for the first time, they might ask, “Who are your people?” and “Where are you from?”

Synopsis:

In these pages is a timeless celebration of the individuals and experiences that help shape young children into the most remarkable and unique beings that they can be.

New York Times bestselling author and CNN analyst Bakari Sellers brings this inspiration, lyrical text about family and community to life with illustrations from Reggie Brown.

Why I like Who Are Your People?

Bakari Sellers’s beautiful picture book celebrates who we are and the people we become. It depicts an African American father who encourages his two children to know their descendants and be proud of the things they accomplished as great activists who struggled for justice, equal rights, voting rights and the hope for a brighter future.  Sellers’s prose is eloquent and it beautifully transitions from the past to the present community that shapes us and encourages dreams. Reggie Brown’s richly textured and vivid illustrations carry the story. Lovely collaboration. Be prepared to read this uplifting book again and again. It is a perfect class read aloud. 

Resources: Although this book is for Black children, it really is a book for ALL children.  We all stand on the shoulders of our ancestors and do the best we can to make a contribution in the world.  So challenge kids and ask them what they dream about and what they want to do to make their world better. Encourage them to interview their grandparents and family members.  Ask them to draw pictures or share their stories. 

Bakari Sellers made history in 2006 when, at just twenty-two years old, he defeated a twenty-six-year incumbent state representative to become the youngest member of the South Carolina state legislature and the youngest African American elected official in the nation. He has been named to TIME’s 40 Under 40 list the The Root’s 100 Most Influential African Americans list. Sellers is the author of the New York Times bestseller My Vanishing Country. He practices law, hosts The Bakari Sellers Podcast, and is a political commentator at CNN. Visit Sellers at his website.

Every Friday, authors and KidLit bloggers post a favorite picture book. To see a complete listing of all the Perfect Picture Books (PPB) with resources, please visit author Susanna Leonard Hill’s website.

*Reviewed from a library copy.

 

Out on a Limb by Jordan Morris

Out on a Limb 

Jordan Morris, Author

Charlie Mylie, Illustrator

Abrams Books for Young Readers, Fiction, Feb. 15, 2022

Suitable for ages: 4-8

Themes: Broken bones, Cast, Injuries, Healing, Patience

Opening: “Lulu surveyed her sympathy trove and smiled. Two new games, three good books, six cards, a dozen daisies, a slew of balloons, and a matching yellow cast for Bonnie Bear. So far, Lulu mused, this broken leg isn’t so bad.”

Book Jacket Synopsis:

Lulu’s leg is broken, but she’s OK. Bonnie Bear has a matching yellow cast. Well-wishers deliver new books, sweet cards, and happy daisies. She finds new ways to do ordinary things—like taking a bath or wearing her favorite pants.

As time wears on, the newness of the cast wears off and the weariness sets in. Lulu grows bored and grumpy by day. Her cast becomes itchy and twitchy at night. Eventually, it’s time to get the cast off, but Lulu’s not ready. What if her leg can’t do all of the things it used to do? What if it breaks again? A visit from Grandpa, a well-timed letter, and the power of healing help get Lulu back on her feet.

Why I like Out on a Limb:

Jordan Morris takes readers on a realistic journey of what happens when Lulu breaks two bones in her leg and deals with her emotions. It concludes when Lulu’s cast is removed and she’s challenged to find the courage to run and play without being afraid she’ll hurt her leg again.  The story line is educational, hopeful and entertaining, 

There is another intriguing journey taking place in Out on a Limb, with a mysterious letter that patiently takes it’s time to reach Lulu. Make sure you look at the endpapers where the letter first appears and follow it’s journey in the story as it reaches Lulu at the perfect moment. Clever addition to the story.     

Charlie Mylie’s predominantly black and white illustrations with splashes of yellow, are expressive and capture Lulu’s emotions, caution and courage.

This is a perfect book to gift any child that is wearing a cast. It’s a great book to read in the pediatrician’s office. And good for teachers who might want to educate primary school children on why another child is in a cast.  

Resources: Many kids will identify with Lulu, so this is a perfect resource book to add to home and school book shelves. Parents will also identify with this story. Good time to share experiences.

Jordan Morris is a designer and creative director in Kansas City, Missouri. A long time ago, she fell off a trampoline and broke her arm. This is her debut picture book.

Every Friday, authors and KidLit bloggers post a favorite picture book. To see a complete listing of all the Perfect Picture Books (PPB) with resources, please visit author Susanna Leonard Hill’s website.
 
*Reviewed from a library copy.

Papa, Daddy and Riley by Seamus Kirst

Papa, Daddy, & Riley

Seamus Kirst, Author

Devon Hozwarth, Illustrator

Magination Press, Fiction, 2020

Suitable for ages: 4-8

Themes: Families, Love, Diversity, Gay fathers, LGBTQ+

Opening: “On the first day of school, my parents walked me to my classroom. My friends were being dropped off by their families, too….I was with my dads.”

Book Jacket Synopsis:

Riley is Papa’s princess and Daddy’s dragon. She love her two fathers! When Riley’s classmate asks her which dad is her real one, Riley is confused. She doesn’t want to have to pick one or the other.

Families are made of love in this heartwarming story that shows there a lots of ways to be part of one.

Why I like Papa, Daddy, and Riley:

Seamus Kirst has written a sweet story about different families that is both contemporary and realistic. It is an important book for young children as it demonstrates how curious, open and honest kids are with each other. When Olive sees Riley’s two fathers on the first day of school, she asks, “So, which one is your dad dad? And where is your mom?” The question confuses and upsets Riley. She has to choose? Both Daddy and Papa reassure Riley that she doesn’t have to choose and tell her that “Love makes a family.”

This is the first time I’ve seen the expression “belly mommy” in reference to the woman who gives birth to Riley. This is a nice inclusion. Riley even has a picture of her. (This meant a lot to me because we adopted two children and I always wished we had photographs of their birth mothers.) 

The different family representations throughout this book, will suit many families. Some kids have one parent, some have two. Some families have stepparents, aunts, uncles, and grandparents who care for them. Some kids have foster parents. Kids need to see their families represented in books. That is why this book is so important.

Devon Holzwarth’s beautiful illustrations are rendered in bright pastels and watercolors. The children’s facial expressions and body language are spot on and so truth to life. The pages are filled with different family representations. I love the diversity.

Resources: This book is a resource. It will prompt many interesting discussions among many different or diverse families.  

Seamus Kirst is a writer who work has been published in The Washington Post, The Guardian, Teen Vogue, Forbes, The Advocate, and Vice. He has always loved reading picture books and is still in slight disbelief he has published one of his own. He is absolutely honored to be able to contribute to LGBTQ representation that he wished he could have read and seen when he was young. He lives in New York with his two cats, Sugar Baby and Bernie Sanders.  Follow him on Twitter and Instagram @SeamusKirst or on Facebook @seamuspatrickkirst. 

Every Friday, authors and KidLit bloggers post a favorite picture book. To see a complete listing of all the Perfect Picture Books (PPB) with resources, please visit author Susanna Leonard Hill’s website.
 
*Copy provided by Magination Press in ecchange for a review. 

 

 

Dear Reader: A Love Letter to Libraries by Tiffany Rose

Dear Reader: A Love Letter to Libraries

Tiffany Rose, Author and Illustrator

Little Bee Books, Fiction, Feb. 8, 2022

Suitable for ages: 4-8

Themes: Diversity, Representation in books, Libraries, Call to action, Make a difference

Opening: Dear Reader, do you see that little girl down there? That’s me with the big hair, the one surrounded by all the books. Look!

Book Jacket Synopsis:

A voracious young reader loves nothing more than going to the library and poring through books all day, making friends with characters and going off on exciting adventures with them. However, the more she reads, the more she notices that most of the books don’t have characters that look like her, and the only ones that do tell about the most painful parts of their history. Where are the heroines with Afros exploring other planets and the superheroes with Afros saving the day?

Why I like Dear Reader:

Wow! I really love this powerful picture book by Tiffany Rose! And it includes one of my favorite themes: kids making a difference. The illustrations are vibrant, expressive, colorful and deliver the message of the importance of representation of people of color in books.

A spirited brown-skinned girl devours books of all sizes and topics, She vicariously sees herself as a heroine who saves the day and goes on many adventures with the characters who become her friends. But, not one character looks like her. Yes, she finds stories about historical characters who deal with struggle, hardship and pain. But she wants to see herself in characters who do magic, fight villains and dragons, 

She invites readers to join her in her call to action to get more diverse books in the hands of readers. She wants to see books that represent people of all color. She urges them to write their own books with the characters and adventures they want to read.  This is a perfect home or classroom read aloud!

Resources: Encourage kids to write and draw a simple picture book where they see themselves represented in adventure stories and as superheroes. There are crayons of different skin tones available now.  Grab a box so kids of all ethnicities can match their own skin tones. 

Tiffany Rose is a left-handed illustrator and author who’s currently living and working in China. She’s a lover of coffee, wanderlust, massive curly Afros, and children being their imaginative, quirky, free selves. She is a full-time teachers, part-time author/illustrator, and world traveler. Rose remembers what it was like as a brown child not seeing herself reflected in the books and characters she loved so dearly, and has been inspired to create art and meaningful stories, like this book and her debut, M is for Melanin, so that underrepresented children and see themselves in books. Pencil in hand, she’s changing that percentage one illustration at a time.

Every Friday, authors and KidLit bloggers post a favorite picture book. To see a complete listing of all the Perfect Picture Books (PPB) with resources, please visit author Susanna Leonard Hill’s website.

*Reviewed from a library copy.

 

I Am Courage: A Book of Resilience by Susan Verde and Peter H. Reynolds

I Am Courage: A Book of Resilience

Susan Verde, Author

Peter H. Reynolds, Illustrator

Abrams Books for Young Readers, Fiction, Sep. 7 2021

Suitable for ages: 4-8

Themes: Courage, Challenges, Resilience

Opening: “When there are challenges in front of me, when I feel unstable, like I might fall…and I think about turning back or giving up.”

Book Jacket Synopsis:

When we picture someone brave we might think they’re fearless, but real courage comes from feelings scared and facing what challenges us anyway. When our minds tell us “I can’t,” we can look inside ourselves and find the strength to say “Yes, I CAN!”

From the New York Times bestselling team behind the I Am Series comes a triumphant celebration of everyday courage: Believing in ourselves, speaking out, trying new things, asking for help, and getting back up no matter how many times we may fall.

Grounded in mindfulness and awareness, I Am Courage is an empowering reminder that we can conquer anything.

Why I love I Am Courage:

Susan Verde’s beautiful prose and timely message is empowering for young children who may be a little anxious about trying something new, but bravely push through their fear and try anyway. In doing so, they build courage and resilience. Readers will see themselves in the main character, who rides his bike through a scary forest, crosses a bridge and takes a few tumbles along the way.  He gets up and faces his challenges, even more determined to succeed. He’s not afraid to ask for support and he’s there to help and encourage others. 

Reynolds’s engaging illustrations are rendered in ink and watercolor and set the mood for the  story. I have really enjoyed their collaborative I Am Series. The series really helps children discover and use the important tools within themselves that will last a lifetime. Follow Verde  and Reynolds  online at their websites.

Resources:  Make sure you check out the Author’s Note and extensive backmatter, which includes special yoga poses and breathing and mindfulness techniques to help readers feel confident.  

Susan Verde is the bestselling author of I Am Yoga, I Am Peace, I Am Human, I Am Love, I Am One, and The Museum, all illustrated by Peter H. Reynolds, as well as Rock ‘n’ Roll Soul, illustrated by Matthew Cordell. She teaches yoga and mindfulness to children and lives with her three children in East Hampton, New York.

Every Friday, authors and KidLit bloggers post a favorite picture book. To see a complete listing of all the Perfect Picture Books (PPB) with resources, please visit author Susanna Leonard Hill’s website.

*Reviewed from a library copy.

 

Love in the Library by Maggie Tokuda-Hall

Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month – May 1 – 31, 2022

Love in the Library

Maggie Tokuda-Hall, Author

Yas Imamura, Illustrator

Candlewick Press, Historical Fiction, Feb. 8, 2022

Themes; Japanese Americans, Relocation camps, Library, World War II, Love, Hope

Suitable for ages: 6-9

Opening: “Tama did not like the desert. She brushed the dust from her eyes as she walked to the library. The barbed wire fences and guard towers cast long shadows over her path. She always did her best not to look at the guards.”

Book Jacket Synopsis:

“The miracle is in us. As long as we believe in change, in beauty, in hope.”

Tama works in the library at the Minidoka incarceration camp, where she is imprisoned because she is Japanese American.  Life in the Idaho camp is relentless and getting through each day is hard. Tama prefers to escape into her books, with their stories of honor and adventure. 

But every day, George is there, too — with a smile, yet another stack of books, and his comforting presence. It is George who helps Tama understand that she isn’t alone, and in that realization, hope if found.

Based on the experience of author Maggie Tokuda-Hall’s own grandparents, who met in Minidoka during World War II, this is a wrenching and beautiful tale of two people who find each other during a time of extreme darkness, and the family born out of their love. 

Why I like Love in the Library:

Love in the Library is an inspiring book for young readers who are introduced to one of America’s darkest periods in history — the internment of Japanese American families living on the West Coast. Mothers, fathers, grandparents, children and babies, shared single rooms in these prison camps. This is an important story to tell because of the fear that pervaded our country during World War II and the social injustices that occurred.

The material is age-appropriate, very factual and allows for a lot of discussion. The lovely gouache and watercolor illustrations will give children a peek into the stark and dreary camps and offer a glimpse of hope.

Even though this is based on the true story, the author helps readers understand how important it is to hope and dream, even under the worst circumstances. It is difficult for Tama to leave college life, but she finds a way to cope by working in the library. It is a place she can escape to and find books that lift her spirit. They are a constant companion, as is the daily visitor, George, who checks out stacks of books. They fall in love in a prison camp where people feel less than human and show their deep inner strength during a challenging time.   

Resources: Make sure you read the Author’s Note at the end of the story. There is a picture of Tama and George Tokuda. This book is a timely read for students today with so much pain and suffering going on in the world around them. It will lead to many interesting discussions. Ask children what helps them cope when they face a difficult situations? Make a list. 

Maggie Tokuda-Hall is Tama and George’s granddaughter, Wendy and Richard’s daughter, and Mikka’s sister. She’s the author of the Parents’ Choice Gold Award-winning picture book Also an Octopus; the YA novel, The Mermaid, the Witch, and the Sea; and the graphic novel Squad. She lives in Oakland, California, with her son, husband, and dog.

Every Friday, authors and KidLit bloggers post a favorite picture book. To see a complete listing of all the Perfect Picture Books (PPB) with resources, please visit author Susanna Leonard Hill’s website.

*Review copy provided by Candlewick Press, in exchange for a review.