Voices Are Not for Yelling

Voices Are Not for Yelling9781575425016_p0_v1_s260x420Voices Are Not for Yelling

Elizabeth Verdick, Author

Marieka Heinlen, Illustrator

Free Spirit Publishing, Nonfiction, April 20, 2015

Suitable for Ages:  Board Book, 0-3, Paperback, 4-7

Themes: Children learning how to use their indoor and outdoor voices

Opening: What do you use your voice for? Talking “Hi!” Asking questions “How are you?” Telling jokes. Laughing . . . Ha, ha! Singing, la, la, la!”

Book Jacket Synopsis:  As every grown-up knows, yelling comes naturally to children. This friendly book introduces and reinforces where and when to use an “indoor voice” or and “outdoor voice.” Simple words and vivid illustrations show the places and times for an indoor voice, the ways people ask us to speak more quietly, and situations when yelling might occur.  Children learn how they can quiet their voices and talk about a problem, supported by a simple reminder: “Think before you yell, and use your words well!”

Why I like this book:

  • This book is available in two versions, a board book for children 0-3 years of age who haven’t gained control of their emotions, and a longer and more in-depth paperback for children 4-7 years of age.
  • The author uses simple words to show children when and where they should use an indoor voice (in a library, classroom, car, movie theater) and an outdoor voice (playing outside, laughing).
  • With toddlers, frustration, yelling, screaming and throwing tantrums are normal.  The book will help small children understand why it’s better to use an indoor voice so people “will hear their words and not the yelling.” It will also teach them how to calm down and ask for help so they can get what they need.
  • Preschool and primary school children will benefit from the paperback book, as they are more advanced and socially conscious of those around them. They will be more likely to understand the concepts being encouraged and how yelling can have an impact on others. They are asked simple questions about what is happening inside them when their voices get louder and louder.
  • Marieka Heinlen’s illustrations are simple, bold, colorful and lively. Every page has a different groups of characters that are diverse and expressive.  The cover on the paperback book is priceless as it quickly identifies what happens when a child yells.
  • The board book is a must for parents with toddlers and the paperback book is perfect to have on hand in the classroom.

Resources: The book alone is a resource with many useful tips for parents and teachers to practice with children. And there are quiet-time gestures that children can learn.  Voices Are Not for Yelling is part of Free Spirit’s the Best Behavior series.  Below are titles in both board and paperback books.

Elizabeth Verdick is the author of more than 40 books for children and teens, including the Best Behavior series, the Happy Healthy Baby and Toddler Tools board book series, and the Laugh and Learn series for preteens. She has written Stand Up to Bullying! and The Survival Guide for Kids with Autism Spectrum Disorders (And Their Parents). 

VoicesAreNotForYelling_BBWords Are Not for Huting9781575421568_p0_v2_s260x420Tales Are Not for Pulling9781575421810_p0_v2_s260x420Germs Are Not for Sharing9781575421971_p0_v2_s260x420

Joey Daring Caring and Curious

Joey Daring9781433816536_p0_v1_s260x420Joey Daring Caring and Curious: How a Mischief Maker Uncovers Unconditional Love

Marcella Marino Craver, MSEd, CAS,  Author

Joanne Lew-Vriethoff, Illustrator

Magination Press, Fiction, Sep. 15, 2014

Suitable for Ages: 4-7

Themes: Love,  Mother and child relationship, Behavior, Favoritism

Opening: “Joey kept thinking the same unpleasant thing over and over.  He thought of it at night. He thought of it in school. He even thought of it while eating ice cream at the park! Finally, he thought: just ask Mom! But could he?”

Synopsis: Joey is worried his mother prefers his siblings over him. After all, Joey is daring, curious and mischievous.  He just can’t seem to stay out of trouble, unlike his older brother and younger sister.  He wonders if his mother has a favorite child and if there is anything about him for his mother to love.  He gather his courage and writes a series of hand-written notes to his mom that will put a smile on your face.

Why I like this book:

  • The author tackles a classic and worrisome question for children with humor, imagination and reassurance. Does my mother favor my brother or sister over me? Am I good enough? Does she love me as much as she does them?  Especially if you are Joey and make a lot of messes, break toys, paint the walls, cut the dog’s hair and test your mother’s patience.
  • This delightful book serves as a wonderful reminder of parental unconditional love. How many times I remember saying to my daughter, “I may not like your behavior or what you have done, but I always love you no matter what.”
  • It subtly emphasizes that breaking rules and independence are an important part of a child’s development.
  • Parents will find this book serves as a great tool to discuss the meaning of unconditional love with their child.
  • Joanne Lew-Vriethoff’s lively, expressive and whimsical illustrations are colorful and done in pen and ink. They perfectly capture the theme of the story. The cover is a great example.

Resources: The one thing I like about books published by Magination Press is they have excellent resources and activities for parents and readers at the end. This book is no exception.

Every Friday, authors and KidLit bloggers post a favorite picture book. To see a complete listing of all the Perfect Picture Books (PPB) with resources, please visit author Susanna Leonard Hill’s Perfect Picture Books.

Confessions of a Former Bully

Confessions of a bully137404387Confessions of a Former Bully

Trudy Ludwig, author

Beth Adams, illustrator

Random House Books, Fiction, 2012

Suitable for ages: 8 – 12

Themes: Bullying, Behavior, Relational Aggression

Opening/Synopsis“A few months ago, I got sent to the principal’s office again.  Only this time, my parents were there waiting for me.  Mom looked like she’d just sucked a lemon.  Dad had steam coming out of her his ears.”  Students reported Katie’s mean behavior towards Monica to a teacher.   It was hard for Katie to hear the principal refer to her as a bully.  She hadn’t thought of herself as a bully, after all she hadn’t hit Monica.  What Katie hadn’t realized was that hurtful words and behavior are also forms of relational bullying.   Katie had to deal with the tough consequences of her behavior with a counselor.  She had to learn about being a better friend, and find a way to make up for the hurt she had caused.  Katie decided to write a journal and turn it into a special book to help kids learn about hurtful behavior from a former bully.

Why I like this book:  Trudy Ludwig wrote this unique book for her readers who wanted to know what happened to Katie after she bullied her friend Monica in  My Secret Bully.   In Confessions of a Former Bully, I liked that the school had an anti-bullying program in place to work with Katie and help her understand how her behavior affected others.  Katie apologized to Monica and all the kids, but they didn’t trust her.  I like that Trudy left no tidy ending.   Katie’s consequences will stay with her until she changes and becomes a better friend.  This is a great classroom book that children will relate to as they will be able to talk about the subject from both perspectives.   Beth Adams illustrated the book like a journal.  It is full of illustrations and very appealing to this age group.

Resources :  The book provides interesting discussion material for the classroom about bullying.  Trudy Ludwig is a member of the International Bullying Prevention Association and is a popular Random House speaker.   Visit Trudy Ludwig at her website.  She has recently written  a Wonder Lessons Guide for Random House about bullying.  A great tool for teachers and parents to use during October’s National Bullying Prevention Month.  You may also want to check out the National Bullying Prevention Center.