All the Feelings Under the Sun: How to Deal with Climate Change by Leslie Davenport

All the Feelings Under the Sun: How to Deal with Climate Change

Leslie Davenport, Author

Jessica Smith, Illustrator

Magination Press, Nonfiction, 2021

Suitable for ages: 10-14 

Themes: Climate change, Emotions, Global warming, Weather  

Publisher’s Synopsis:

Climate change challenges every part of our world and our lives, and learning about it can bring up some big emotions.

Discover all the ways that nature is beautiful, powerful, delicate, fierce, mysterious, and awesome. Find ways to take action and cope with big emotions with journal prompts and self-guided activities you can do anywhere. Read about kids just like you who have made a difference, and what the future looks like.

Climate change affects everyone…but change can start with you.

Why I like this book:

After reviewing Alan Gratz’s new novel Two Degrees last week, I thought All the Feelings Under the Sun: How to Deal with Climate Change would pair nicely with his book and help young people process their feelings about what they hear on the news and experience personally in their communities. 2022 has been an active year. Many kids worldwide have lived through wildfires in California and Colorado, hurricanes in Florida and Mexico, major flooding in the Appalachians, Nigeria and Pakistan, an earthquake in China and summer droughts and heat waves throughout Europe, and tornadoes in the southern states.  

Climate change is scary for everyone. Davenport says that dealing with emotions like anger, fear, sadness will help young people “build inner resiliency: our emotional strength” This is a perfect book for teachers and school libraries to include in their studies and discussions about climate change. .

The book is beautifully crafted and easy to read with fun and interesting illustrations. There are five chapters: How We Know What We Know, The Earth is Heating Up, Everything is Connected, Practicing Eco-Justice, and Making a Healthier World Together. Readers will learn the differences between climate change, global warming and weather events. Each chapter includes age appropriate facts, encourages journaling, writing and art activities, and includes exercises to help readers calm themselves and build courage. Acknowledging feelings of anxiety can free readers so that they can become part of the solution. Davenport encourages readers to discover what they believe, what they are passionate about and how they can use their own talents to help create a healthier environment. The book includes some fascinating information about what they can learn from Indigenous traditions and “see all parts of nature as our relatives.”  They will meet many young people, like Greta Thunberg, and important youth groups that encourage kids to make a difference through art, writing, legal efforts, and social media campaigns. Some may choose to become climate activists.

Links to youth organizations that have come together to create many organizations to strengthen their voices through collective action and peer support. The author recommends the following groups: Zero House, young people focused on climate and environmental justice and Sunrise,.young people who believe that reversing climate change means reorganizing how the government operates. Read about their activities in the book and check out their sites.

Leslie Davenportis a Marriage and Family Therapist bringing 30 years of clinical experience to the emerging field of Climate Psychology. She works as an educator and consultant to institutes recognizing the benefits of behavioral research for cultural shifts and policy change. She is the author of three previous books, including Emotional Resiliency in the Era of Climate Change. Leslie has worked at Ground Zero on disaster mental health teams and is on faculty with the California Institute of Integral Studies. She has offices in Tacoma, WA, and in the San Francisco Bay Area. Visit Davenport at her website

Greg Pattridge hosts Marvelous Middle Grade Monday posts on his wonderful Always in the Middle website. Make sure you check out the many links to see all of the wonderful reviews by KidLit bloggers and authors.

*Review copy provided by Imagination Press in exchange for a review.

 

Two Degrees by Alan Gratz

Two Degrees: A Planet in crisis. And time is running out.

Alan Gratz, Author

Scholastic Books, Fiction, Oct. 4, 2022

Suitable for ages: 8-12

Pages: 384

Themes: Climate change, Global warming, Survival, Adventure,  Science and nature 

Publisher’s Synopsis:

Fire. Ice. Flood. Three climate disasters.

Four kids fighting for their lives.

Akira is riding her horse in the California woods when a wildfire sparks–and grows scarily fast. How can she make it to safety when there are flames everywhere?

Owen and his best friend, George, are used to seeing polar bears on the snowy Canadian tundra. But when one bear gets way too close for comfort, do the boys have any chance of surviving?

Natalie hunkers down at home as a massive hurricane barrels toward Miami. When the floodwaters crash into her house, Natalie is dragged out into the storm–with nowhere to hide.

Akira, Owen, George, and Natalie are all swept up in the devastating effects of climate change. They are also connected in ways that will shock them–and could alter their destinies forever.

Bestselling author Alan Gratz is at the top of his game, shining a light on our increasingly urgent climate crisis while spinning an action-packed story that will keep readers hooked–and inspire them to take action.

What’s to like about Two Degrees:

I am an Alan Gratz fan and I feel he’s outdone himself with Two Degrees. It is a brilliant action-packed novel about the most important topic of this century — our rapidly changing climate. It is a breathtaking  read, but it will also have readers holding their breaths as they encounter many suspenseful moments and wonder what will happen next.  I felt a lot of energy in this novel that I am hopeful will energize readers to do something. 

This is storytelling at its finest.  It is a  necessary story with a harrowing and fast-paced plot that will keep readers engaged.  Just look at that gorgeous and engaging cover. It speaks to readers.  

Gratz did a remarkable amount of research in his thoughtfully penned novel. Although he focused his story in North America, he also addresses climate change worldwide. That’s why there are moments that are truly chilling as readers watch Akira, Natalie, Owen and George in survival mode outsmarting fires, rising waters and polar bears. Make sure you check out his author’s note at the end and learn about how he created each character. 

The story is written in three alternating stories, each ending with a big cliff hangar, which adds to the suspense. The characters are authentic and their engrossing stories are drawn from real-life situations that are particularly relevant with the recent wildfires in the west and fury of Hurricane Ian. All four characters are courageous, determined and committed.  And they are connected in ways they can hardly imagine in an over-the-top (crescendo) ending that will inspire and energize students to want to do something about climate change.  As Natalie realizes in the story “we can’t do it alone, it will take all of us doing something.”  

Gratz’s novel belongs in school libraries and would encourage interesting discussions in classrooms. Many readers will have already lived through wildfires, hurricanes, tornadoes, and droughts. Climate change can be scary and it is important that readers are in touch with their feelings. Next week I’m reviewing All the Feelings Under the Sun: How to Deal with Climate Change by Leslie Davenport. It pairs beautifully with Two Degrees.    

Alan Gratz is the #1 New York Times bestselling author of many highly acclaimed books for young readers include Ground Zero, Refugee, Allies, Projekt 1065, and Prisoner B-3087.  Alan lives in North Carolina with his wife and daughter. Look for him online at his website.

Greg Pattridge hosts Marvelous Middle Grade Monday posts on his wonderful Always in the Middle website. Make sure you check out the many links to see all of the wonderful reviews by KidLit bloggers and authors.

*Reviewed from a purchased copy.

 

 

Dangerous Wildfires by Lola Schaefer – PPBF

Dangerous Wildfires: Part of the Lightning Bolt Book Collection

Lola Schaefer, Author

Photographs: Acknowledgments of contributors at the end of the book

Lerner Publications, Nonfiction,  Jan. 1, 2022

Suitable for ages: 6 – 9

Themes: Wildfires, Climate Change, Danger, Staying Safe 

Opening: “Lightning strikes dry grass. The wind blows and sparks fly. A fire begins.”

Publisher’s Synopsis:

Climate change is making wildfires worse, and it’s important to know how to stay safe. Read about what causes a fire, what makes it grow, and what happens when fire makes people leave their homes.

A spark from a lightning strike or a campfire can quickly grow into a wildfire covering acres. Learn about the types of wildfires, how climate change increases the danger, and how to stay safe. Plus hear from a wildfire survivor!

Why I like this book:

Many readers live in areas where wildfires reek havoc in the forests around them.  Sadly, wildfires are becoming part of their lives. And if they aren’t personally impacted they see the wildfires reported on the daily news.

This book is age appropriate for emerging readers, 6-9. It is beautifully designed so that readers will enjoy the simple text — four chapters that explain what happens, gives important facts, answers many of their questions, and includes  amazing photographs on each page that showcase wildfires from beginning to end. Each photo has a brief insert that points to what the text explains. Readers will be surprised to learn that wildfires can do some good.  

This book is part of a larger series, the Earth in Danger — part of the Lightning Bolt Books collection.. Some of the other titles include: Dangerous Blizzards, Dangerous Droughts, Dangerous Earthquakes, Dangerous Floods, Dangerous Hurricanes, Dangerous Tornadoes, and Dangerous Volcanoes. Sadly enough, we are dealing with all of these dangers every year.

These books belong in every elementary school library. They are perfect go-to books that can be used in the classroom or used by kids for reports.

Resources: The book is a resource and will lead to many important discussions at home and school.  If you live in areas where wildfires begin, put together a safety kit for home or school (instructions in the book).

You may want to check out the Smokey the Bear Link for kids and educators. Sign up to be a Smokey’s Scout and explore the fun activities.   

Lola Schaefer is a professional author, teacher and public speaker. She has published more than 275 books in the past 25 years with trade, school/library, and classroom publishers. She is a writing consultant in elementary and middle schools, as well as a frequent presenter at writing conferences and workshops. She lives and works in Georgia.

Every Friday, authors and KidLit bloggers post a favorite picture book. To see a complete listing of all the Perfect Picture Books (PPB) with resources, please visit author Susanna Leonard Hill’s website.

*Reviewed from a library copy.

 

 

 

L

No Voice Too Small: Fourteen Young American Making History

No Voice Too Small: 14 Young Americans Making History

Lindsay H. Metcalf and Keila V. Dawson, Editors

Jeanette Bradley, Editor/Illustrator

Charlesbridge, Nonfiction, Sep. 22, 2020

Suitable for ages: 6 – 11

Themes: Youth activism, Making a difference, Bullying, Clean Water, Climate Change, Gun Violence, Poetry

Publisher’s Synopsis:

“You’re never too young or too small to change the world.” – Mari Copeny

This all-star anthology covers fourteen youth activists calling for change and fighting for justice across the United States. These change-makers represent a wide range of life experiences and causes, including racial justice, clean water, LGBTQ+ rights, mental health, and more, Beautifully illustrated poems by #ownvoices authors, plus secondary text, spotlight the efforts and achievements of such luminaries as Marley Dias, Jazz Jennings, and Mari Copeny, “Make Some Noise” tips will inspire readers to take concrete action for change, Back matter includes more information on the poetic forms used in the book.

Why I like this book:

No Voice Too Small will inspire and empower young readers, parents and teachers. This is my favorite kind of book to share with readers because there is an urgency among young people who see the injustice around them, are concerned that adults aren’t doing enough, and want to take action to improve their communities, country and world. They are brave and working for the rights of children in a peaceful manner.

Readers will hear from Nza-Ari Khepra, 16, who loses a friend to gun violence in Chicago and launches Project Orange Tree, which grows into the National Gun Violence Awareness Day celebrated every June. Meet Ziad Ahmed,14, who is treated unfairly in high school because he’s Muslim, and creates an online platform where students can share their stories and stop hate. Levi Draheim, 8, fears the loss of his Florida home to rising seas and joins 21 kids who sue the US government for failing to act on climate change. Jasilyn Charger, 19, protests the construction of a pipeline that threatens to leak oil into the Missouri River that provide water for Standing Rock Sioux Tribe and many other people living downstream.

The book is beautifully designed. The #own voices authors and editors, Lindsay H. Metcalf and Keila V. Dawson, capture each child’s captivating story in an attractive double-page spread. The left side of every spread features a soulful poem with warm and appealing illustrations of each child by Jeanette Bradley. The text about the young person’s contribution is featured on the right, along with additional artwork by Bradley. Read their stories and you will be inspired.

Resources: The book is a resource for students to use in the classroom.  At the end of the book there is a section about each of the 14 poets who participated and a page of the poetry form used. This book will spark many lively discussions and encourage young people to identify a problem and think about what they may do alone or together to create change and improve their community, country and world.  What will you do?

Lindsay H. Metcalf is the author of Farmers Unite! Planting a Protest for Fair Prices. She has also been a reporter, editor, and columnist for the Kansas City Star and other news outlets.

Keila V. Dawson has been a community organizer and an early childhood special education teacher. She is the author of The King Cake Baby. 

Jeanette Bradley has been an urban planner, an apprentice pastry chef, and the artist-in­-residence for a traveling art museum on a train. She is the author and illustrator of Love, Mama.

Greg Pattridge hosts Marvelous Middle Grade Monday posts on his wonderful Always in the Middle website. Check out the MMGM link to see all of the wonderful reviews by KidLit bloggers and authors.

*Review copy provided by the editors in exchange for a review.