Where Snow Angels Go by Maggie O’Farrell

Where Snow Angels Go

Maggie O’Farrell, Author

Daniela Jaglenka Terrazzini, Illustrator

Candlewick Press, Fiction, Nov. 16, 2021

Suitable for Ages: 7-10

Pages: 72

Themes: Snow Angel, Illness, Family, Friends, Fable, Magical

Opening“Have you ever woken suddenly, in the middle of the night, without knowing why?”

Book Jacket Synopsis:  One night, Sylvie wakes up and is astonished to see, standing beside her bed, a figure in white with enormous feathery wings.  Is it possible that something extraordinary has happened? Could this be the angel she made last winter in the snow? 

The snow angel has returned to her, with a very important mission: to save her life. Sylvie is ill and the snow angel awakens her mother. He assures Sylvie that she will forget all about him as soon as she goes to sleep, but somehow, she doesn’t. Sylvie then tries everything she can think of to bring him back to earth, but nothing works. Until one winter’s day, when Sylvie looks around and wonders whether her friends and family have their own protective angel. How can she convince her Snow Angel to help with this monumental task?

Why I like this book:

Maggie O’Farrell’s is a modern fable/fairy tale that will fill kids with wonder. It is a cozy bedtime read aloud that reminds me a bit of the books that were read to me as a child. The narrative is a bit lengthy, but lends itself to the author’s beautiful lyrical prose. I love that the story began with a bedtime story she made up for her own children. Where Snow Angels Go will lead to many meaningful discussions.

Sylvie is a compassionate and selfless character who wants to make contact with her snow angel after she recovers from a lengthy illness. Sylvie faces some other dangerous challenges and she senses the snow angel is with her in different forms. She realizes that the snow angel is her protector and she wants to make sure that her family and other children have protectors. This story will warm your heart.

The cover on the book is stunning. The swirls around Sylvie are in silver, adding to the book’s appeal. Daniela Jaglenka Terrazzini’s dreamy illustrations are magical and capture the wonder in O’Farrell’s story. I have many favorite scenes, but I love the ones of Sylvie with her snow angel. Children will enjoy pouring over the pages.

Resources/Activities: Winter is here, a time of adventure for children. After the next snow, go outside with your children and make your own snow angels.  Take pictures of your snow angels. You may even want to draw pictures.

Maggie O’Farrell was born in Northern Ireland. She is the author of nine books for adults, one of which won the Costa Novel Award. Where Snow Angels Go is her first book for children. She lives in Edinburgh with her three children, many cats and a mysterious tortoise.

Every Friday, authors and KidLit bloggers post a favorite picture book. To see a complete listing of all the Perfect Picture Books (PPB) with resources, please visit author Susanna Leonard Hill’s website.

*Review copy provided by Candlewick Press in exchange for a review.

 

They Only See the Outside by Kalli Dakos

They Only See the Outside

Kalli Dakos, Author

Jimothy Oliver, Illustrator

Magination Press, Poetry, Mar. 23, 2021

Suitable for ages:  7- 10

Themes: Poetry, Emotions, Bullying, Name calling, Illness, Death, War, Immigration, Separation 

Kalli Dakos has written a beautiful collection of poetry that explores what kids feel on the inside that can’t be seen from the outside. The poems focus on everyday experiences that range from body image, the death of a pet or friend, and homework, to friends moving away, living in a wheelchair and the difficulties of being a refugee.

Kids will relate to each poem in some manner. They are written in free verse, which makes them fun and contemporary. The poems nudge kids to explore their own feelings about each subject. Oliver’s sensitive and expressive illustrations complement the poems and make them relatable. 

I Will Never Crumble

I’m in a wheelchair.

My dad is too.

I want to ride a bike.

I want to hike.

I want to run in the wind. 

I want to play soccer.

But I can’t.

I ask my dad, 
“why me?  Why us?

My dad says,

“Why NOT Us?

Life is unfair,

but we must go on anyway…

They Only See the Outside is a perfect tool for teachers, parents and counselors. The poems can be read aloud and discussed. The poems will introduce kids to writing free verse. Encourage kids to write their own poems about something they are feeling inside. And they can be humorous. Writing can help draw out feelings and make them easier to talk about. I highly recommend this book!

Kalli Dakos is a children’s poet and educator. She visits schools across the United States and Canada to encourage children and teacher to write about their own lives. She has written many collections of school poems that include six ILA/CBC Children’s Choice Selections, such as If You’re Not Here, Please Raise Your Hand. She lives in Ottawa, Canada, and has an office in Ogdensburg, NY. Visit here at her website

Greg Pattridge hosts Marvelous Middle Grade Monday posts on his wonderful Always in the Middle website. Check out the link to see all of the wonderful reviews by KidLit bloggers and authors.

*Review copy provided by Magination Press in exchange for a review.  

The Runaways by Ulf Stark

The Runaways

Ulf Stark, Author

Kitty Crowther, Illustrator

Gecko Press, Fiction, Apr. 2, 2019

Pages: 144

Suitable for Ages: 6-11

Themes: Grandfather, Illness, Hospital, Lying, Runaways, Multigenerational families, Loss

Synopsis:

Grandpa is in the hospital and hating it. He swears at the nurses and makes trouble for everyone. Dad finds it too stressful to visit. But Gottfried Junior loves his Grandpa and visits him as often as he’s allowed, and when he’s not allowed, he goes anyway. He even sneaks him forbidden foods and beverages.

Grandpa thinks only of the place he was happiest — the island where he lived with Grandma. He wants to go back one last time, but they won’t let him out of the hospital.

Gottfried Junior and Grandpa take things into their own hands. If running away is the only way to the island, then they’ll be runaways.

Why I like this book:

I have to admit the title and cover of this book caught my eye. As I leafed through the pages, I knew that it would be a book that would resonate with children who have ailing grandparents and perhaps children who are ill. It’s packed with adventure, some clever planning, a good dose of humor, and sweet memories.

Every grandparent deserves a compassionate and loyal grandchild like Gottfried Junior, who outsmarts his parent to find ways to make secret trips to visit his grandpa at the hospital. Gottfried listens to his grumpy grandpa, his angry rants about the horrible food and being confined to a bed after he broke his leg twice. But Gottfried also remembers all the fun adventures he had with his grandpa. Together they hatch a plan to spring Grandpa from the hospital for two days, without Gottfried’s parents knowing.

The execution of the plan rests entirely on Gottfried, who arranges all of the details which include faking an overnight footbal trip; arranging the food; hiring a baker friend to help him wheel Grandpa out of the hospital and driving them to the dock to take a boat to the island. Everything goes off without a hitch, but Gottfried has to wrestle with “is it ever a good thing to lie sometimes?”

It is important for children to see how Gottfried’s grandpa handles the end of his life. He has one wish, to return to the home he built for his wife and spend time there remembering all the good in his life. In making the trip with Grandpa, Gottfried learns that death is not something to fear, that it’s important to remember joyful memories, and find closure with family members. I won’t spoil the beautiful ending.

The Runaways is written by Swedish author, Ulf Stark, and has been translated into English. It has a European feel to it, especially with the beautiful colored-pencil illustrations by Kitty Crowther that grace the chapters and give readers an additional experience.

Quote:

“I’d helped him get to the old house he’d built one last time. He’d been able to breathe in the smell of the sea. And I’d been down to the cellar and collected the last jar of lingonberry jam that he said somehow still had Grandma in it.” Page 72

Ulf Stark was born in Stockholm, Sweden, in 1944. He has written around thirty books for children and young adults, translated into more than twenty languages. He has won many prizes in Sweden and internationally, including the German Youth Literature Prize and the Astrid Lindgren Memorial Award.

Greg Pattridge hosts Marvelous Middle Grade Monday posts on his wonderful Always in the Middle website. Check out the link to see all of the wonderful reviews by KidLit bloggers and authors.

*Reviewed from a library copy.

Finding Granny by Kate Simpson

Finding Granny

Kate Simpson, Author

Gwynneth Jones, Illustrator

EK Books, Fiction, Jul. 3, 2018

Suitable for Ages: 4-8

Themes: Aging grandparents, Coping with an illness, Intergenerational relationships, Family

Opening: “Edie’s Granny is a playtime Granny, a bedtime, story-time pantomime Granny, an I’m not afraid of some slime Granny.”

Synopsis:

Edie’s Granny loves her with the fierceness of a lion Granny. They enjoy being together whether it’s eating ice cream cones, or snuggling up on the couch together proudly displaying their animal slippers. Then one day an ambulance arrives and takes Granny to the hospital.

When Edie arrives at the hospital, she is confronted by the physical changes in her grandmother. The lady in the bed, doesn’t look like Granny. She muddles words. Her smile is crooked and she’s confined to a bed.  Her mother has to feed her. This isn’t the Granny Edie knows. The doctor tells Edie and her mother that Granny had a stroke. Edie visits every day with her mother, but stays outside of her room.

When Edie’s mother takes her to watch one of Granny’s art therapy sessions, she begins to see the Granny she loves is still there, with her sense of humor intact.

Why I like this book:

This is a heartwarming story about the loving bond between Edie and her Granny, and the changes that occur in their relationship when her grandmother has a stroke.

It focuses on a common illness, like a stroke. It also sensitively explores ways for children to cope with a family illness and the rehabilitation process that follows. The book is age-appropriate and will bring children comfort.

The colorful illustrations expressively show Edie’s emotions, which range from indignation, worry,  anger, sadness, and surprise. Kids will watch how Edie finds her way to reconnect with Granny again.

Resources: The book alone is a resource for family members. According to the American Heart and the American Stroke Association, someone in the United States has a stroke every 40 seconds.  There is valuable information for family members, a video of a little girl saving her father’s life by calling 911, and moving forward as a family.

Kate Simpson spent her childhood with her nose in a book but always thought writing was something that other people did. In her thirties, Kate finally decided to give it a try and discovered that ideas can come from anywhere and writing can be for anyone. When she’s not writing or reading, Kate loves board games and laughter, the feel of the sun on her face, and spending time with family, particularly her two young children. This is her first picture book.

Every Friday, authors and KidLit bloggers post a favorite picture book. To see a complete listing of all the Perfect Picture Books (PPB) with resources, please visit author Susanna Leonard Hill’s website.

*Review copy provided by the publisher.

Sun Kisses, Moon Hugs

Sun Kisses, Moon Hugspdf_coverLRSun Kisses, Moon Hugs

Susan Bernardo, Author

Courtenay Fletcher, Illustrator

Inner Flower Child Books, Fiction, Nov. 15, 2012

Suitable for:  Ages 4 and up

Themes:  Separation, Anxiety, Grief, Divorce, Inspirational, Reassurance

Opening/Synopsis:  “No matter how far apart we are, I’ll always find ways to tell you I love you./ How?/ From wherever we stand, you see the moon and I see the moon.  That is how we can send each other hugs./ Moon hugs?/  Yes, moon hugs.”  This story is told through the seasons and delivers a very powerful message to children — love is eternal.   

Why I like this bookSun Kisses, Moon Hugs is pure poetry and a visual feast for the eyes.   Written and illustrated by two friends,  Susan and Courtenay have taken a sad subject about separation and created a beautiful consoling book for children.  It is written in dialogue, but is very lyrical and inspirational.  It is the perfect book to use with children when they are dealing with separation from a parent because of deployment or job, loss, illness, divorce,  and tragedy.   The dialogue in the book gives kids the vocabulary to feel connected and to feel the presence of a loved one — and it’s all done through signs of nature. The illustrations are big, vibrant and breathtaking, and include children from all cultures.  The book is simply beautiful!

Sun KissesIllust_2lr

Favorite rhymes:

“But the moon doesn’t have any arms!/It’s true the moon cannot reach down to hold your hand, but she is strong enough to pull waves onto sand./Her invisible arms rock the tides by night and day, like my love holds you safely when I am away.”

“But when I wake up, the moon will be gone!/ Ahh, but then we can send each other kisses by dawn.  When you open your eyes and see the sun rise, just do this…blow a kiss.”

“From the heavens above to earth below, there are infinite ways to say hello.  Love is in each star twinkling in space and every frosty snowflake tickling your face.”

Resources:  The book alone is a beautiful resource.   Children will be wide-eyed with questions as you snuggle with them to read Sun Kisses, Moon Hugs.   You may visit the author’s website for more information.

Every Friday, authors and KidLit bloggers post a favorite picture book.  To see a complete listing of all the Perfect Picture Books with resources, please visit author Susanna Leonard Hill’s Perfect Picture Books.

This book has been provided to me free of charge by the author/publisher in exchange for an honest review of the work. 

Kathy’s Hats: A Story of Hope

Kathy’s Hats:  A Story of Hope

Trudy Krisher, author

Nadine Bernard Westcott, illustrator

Albert Whitman & Company, Fiction, 1992

Suitable for: Ages 6-10

Themes:  Childhood cancer, Hair Loss, Hope, Self-esteem

Opening/Synopsis: “When I was born, I was almost bald.  My mother tied a tiny green ribbon to my little puff of fuzz.  This was my first hat.”  Kathy has a hat for every occasion.  Then one day when Kathy turns 9 years old, she finds out she has cancer.  Because of her cancer she feels angry, sick and scared.  There are some moving lines in the story:  “I didn’t like it when they poked me with needles to put the medicine in…I didn’t like it when I felt sick from the medicine…and the worst thing about the medicine was that it made my hair fall out.”   Kathy’s mother buys her lots of hats to cover her bald head, but she looses interest in her hats.  One day Kathy puts a bear pin on her hat and all her friends begin to give her pins for her hat.  They rally behind her on her journey.

Why I like this book:  I remember when this book first came out.  The author is from my home town and I went to a book signing to get copies for two children who were dealing with cancer and the aftermath of the chemo therapy.  I loved the idea of this book because it is so upbeat and encouraging.  I knew it would help them feel less alone.  Since my original purchase, the book has been picked up by a larger publisher and more text added.   Nadine’s illustrations are colorful and support the realistic, but positive story line.  Trudy wrote the book for her daughter who had cancer.  This is an outstanding book to help students in the classroom understand what a classmate with cancer is going through.  I highly recommend it.

Resources:  September was National Childhood Cancer Awareness Month.  I discovered  a wonderful curriculum for teachers to use in the classroom at the Live Strong at School website.    For parents resources  visit the National Children’s Cancer Society, Childhood Cancer Lifeline,  American Childhood Cancer Organization.

Every Friday, authors and KidLit bloggers post a favorite picture book.  To see a complete listing of all the Perfect Picture Books with resources, please visit author Susanna Leonard Hill’s Perfect Picture Books.