The Wolf’s Curse by Jessica Vitalis

The Wolf’s Curse

Jessica Vitalis, Author

Greenwillow Books, Fiction, Sep. 21, 2021

Suitable for ages: 8-12

Themes: Death, Grief, Rites and ceremonies, Orphans, Wolves, Grandfathers, Fantasy

Book Jacket Synopsis:

The Wolf is not bound by the same rules as you are.

The Great White Wolf is very, very old. And she is tired. After living through 700 winters, she id searching for someone to take her place. But she is invisible to most people. In all those years, only three have seen her. One died young. One said no. One is still alive a — a twelve-year-old boy named Gauge.

Gauge lives in the fictional French village of Bouge-by-the-Sea with his grandfather, Bastien the Carpenter, and works hard as his apprentice. He’s been hiding much of his life in his grandfather’s shop, just because he once saw the invisible Wolf — and right after that the Lord Mayor’s wife died. Now his only protector, his beloved grandpapá, has died.

Everyone in the village is superstitious about death and believes that Gauge is a Voyant — witch. Gauge wants nothing to do with the Wolf, but the Wolf visits the boy regularly. The Wolf has an offer. She can save him the pain of growing up. Now that he’s all alone in the world, it may be the only way to escape the bounty on his head. If only his grandpapá’s last words hadn’t been, Stay away from the Wolf.

Why I like The Wolf’s Curse:

Jessica Vitalis’s debut novel, The Wolf’s Curse, is a captivating and unforgettable fantasy about about death, grief, loneliness, superstitions, magic, and friendship.  The storytelling is exceptional and full of depth. The plot is risky and engaging. And the ending is perfection. This is a story that will remain with readers. 

This beautiful tale is narrated by a snarky female Wolf, who has her own back story to tell. She’s old and tired and has set her hopes on Gauge taking her place to free the souls of Gatineau from their bodies and help them on their journey to a place of rest. The Wolf is not harmful. The Wolf also tells the stories of the the other characters and brings some humor to the story. Fans of The Book Thief may enjoy this novel.

Gauge is a relatable character who has endured isolation, loneliness and anger because of  how he’s been treated by the villagers. But, he’s also courageous and wise. When his grandpapá dies, he has no choice but to emerge from hiding and deal with his releasing ceremony alone.  With a bounty on his head, no one seems to care about Gauge, except Roux, the Blacksmith’s kind and smart daughter. They hide Gauge in their home while the authorities hunt for him. When Roux loses her father to lung disease, the two friends begin to question the village’s long-held beliefs and rituals, and search for the truth. In doing so, they bravely expose corruption.

The Wolf’s Curse addresses difficult and thought-provoking topics with a wonderful sense of hopefulness. It will enable readers to discuss death in a way that is less scary.

Jessica Vitalis is a full-time writer with a previous career in business and an MBS from Columbia Business School. An American expat, she now lives in Canada with her husband and two daughters. This is her first novel. Visit her at her website

Greg Pattridge hosts Marvelous Middle Grade Monday posts on his wonderful Always in the Middle website. Check out the link to see all of the wonderful reviews by KidLit bloggers and authors.

*Review copy won on Natalie Aguirre’s website Literary Rambles, where she interviews authors and agents weekly and offers many giveaway opportunities to her readers. Make sure you check out her wonderful site and read her fascinating interview with Jessica Vitalis.

 

 

 

 

About Patricia Tiltonhttps://childrensbooksheal.wordpress.comI want "Children's Books Heal" to be a resource for parents, grandparents, teachers and school counselors. My goal is to share books on a wide range of topics that have a healing impact on children who are facing challenges in their lives. If you are looking for good books on grief, autism, visual and hearing impairments, special needs, diversity, bullying, military families and social justice issues, you've come to the right place. I also share books that encourage art, imagination and creativity. I am always searching for those special gems to share with you. If you have a suggestion, please let me know.

20 thoughts on “The Wolf’s Curse by Jessica Vitalis

  1. Quite a few intriguing aspects of the plot, especially the characters and the hard issues addressed. Definitely a story I want to read, but will have to wait until the summer. Thanks for featuring this enticing review on MMGM.

    Like

    • This would make an excellent summer read. You are right about the main characters — engaging and brave! Also found it interesting how gullible a community can be — and of course the two teens expose what is really happening!

      Like

  2. I haven’t seen this book before (I think I missed Natalie’s post on Literary Rambles), but the story sounds so compelling—the exploration of grief through the eyes of these two characters sounds amazing. (And the blurb by Erin Entrada Kelly definitely helps too!) Thanks so much for the wonderful post, Patricia!

    Like

    • The story is compelling from the start. I couldn’t put it down. Don’t want to say too much about the community’s views and rituals surrounding death as I don’t want to spoil the story. It only takes one person to start a rumor and people follow. But it only takes two teens who risk their lives to reveal the truth.

      Liked by 1 person

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