Franklin Endicott and the Third Key by Kate DiCamillo

Franklin Endicott and the Third Key: Tales from Deckawoo Drive Vol. 6

Kate DiCamillo, Author

Chris Van Dusen, Illustrator

Candlewick Press, Fiction, Jun. 8, 2021

Suitable for ages: 6-9

Themes:  Worry, Courage, Mystery, Humor, Friendship

Publisher’s Synopsis:

Frank Endicott is a worrier. He worries about lions, submarines, black holes, leprosy, and armadillos. He lists his worries alphabetically in a notebook and suffers vivid nightmares that even a certain neighborhood pig can’t dispatch.

When Frank accompanies Eugenia Lincoln on an errand to duplicate a key at her favorite dark and dusty thrift shop, Frank earns fresh cause for alarm. Greeting them through the window is a headless mannequin, with a dead toothy weasel sitting on its shoulder. Miss Lincoln leaves Frank to wait alone with the shop’s proprietor, odd Buddy Lamp,  while she runs some errands.  As Frank browses while he waits, he spots an piece of amber with a dead insect inside and a jar full of eyeballs.

When Mr. Lamp presents Frank with the original key and its copy, he’s surprised to find a mysterious third key in the envelop. He tries to return the key, but Mr. Lamp insists that he’s never seen the key before and refuses to take it back. Will Frank be able to bravely face his fears and deal with the unexpected key. After all there is a mystery to solve. With a little help from friends (old and new), hot cocoa, and some classic short stories read aloud, the prognosis is good.

The latest tale from Deckawoo Drive—and New York Times best-selling creators Kate DiCamillo and Chris Van Dusen—is a balm for young worrywarts facing the unknown.

What’s to like about this book:

Kate DiCamillo’s delivery style is unique and appealing for young readers. She writes beautifully but thinks simply in her chapter books. Her simple sentences are packed with big words that challenge readers. It is a fun and engaging book for emerging readers.

This is volume six in the Tales from Deckawoo Drive. Franklin Endicott is a worrier and many children will identify with his story as he learns he has more courage than he gives himself credit. Many of the same characters reappear in each of the stories, including Eugenia Franklin, a quirky neighbor who nudges Franklin to take risks. Buddy Lamp is also has a strange way about him. I mean, who collects eyeballs. But it works well in this story! And of course, Mercy Watson the pig makes an appearance.

Van Dusen’s frequent illustrations add so much to the story and capture with wonderful exaggeration all the drama, humor and emotions of Franklin’s journey. 

Kate DiCamillo is the beloved author of many books for young readers, including the Mercy Watson and Tale from Deckawoo Drive. Her book Flora & Ulysses and the Tale of Despereaux both received Newberry Medals. A former National Ambassador for Young People’s Literature, Kate DiCamillo lives in Minneapolis.

Greg Pattridge hosts Marvelous Middle Grade Monday posts on his wonderful Always in the Middle website. Check out the link to see all of the wonderful reviews by KidLit bloggers and authors.

*Review copy provided by Candlewick Press in exchange for a review.  

The Rock from the Sky by Jon Klassen

The Rock from the Sky

Jon Klassen, Author/Illustrator

Candlewick Press, Fiction, Apr. 13, 2021

Pages: 96

Suitable for ages: 4-8

Themes: Animals, Falling rocks, Sky, Friendship, Humor

Opening: “I like standing in this spot. It is my favorite spot to stand. I don’t want to stand anywhere else.” 

Publisher’s Synopsis

There is a spot.
It is a good spot.
It is the perfect spot to stand.
There is no reason to ever leave.
But somewhere above there is also a rock.
A rock from the sky.

Here comes The Rock from the Sky, a hilarious meditation on the workings of friendship, fate, shared futuristic visions, and that funny feeling you get that there’s something off somewhere, but you just can’t put your finger on it. Merging broad visual suspense with wry wit, celebrated picture book creator Jon Klassen gives us a wholly original comedy for the ages.

Why I like this book:

Classic Jon Klassen absurdity and dark, dry humor that children will find silly and beg for more. It is also a story about inflexibility, fate, premonitions/feelings, imagination and friendship. There are three quirky, big-eyed characters — turtle, armadillo and a snake — all sporting hats.

The book text is spare and is written in five chapters — The Rock, The Fall,, The Future, The Sunset and No More Room — although each chapter feels more like a vignette. 

The illustrations are classic Klassen with his muted pallet — a desert-like setting, two plants, a big open sky and two big rocks that fall from the sky. A fun read for the entire family or in the classroom.

Jon Klassen is the creator of the #1 New York Times best-selling I Want My Hat Back, which won a Theodor Seuss Geisel Honor, and its companions This Is Not My Hat, which won a Caldecott Medal and a Kate Greenaway Medal, and We Found a Hat, named a Publishers Weekly Best Children’s Book of the Year. He is also the illustrator of Extra Yarn, Sam and Dave Dig a Hole, Triangle, and Square, all by Mac Barnett, and House Held Up by Trees by Td Kooser. Originally from Nagara Falls, Ontario, Jon Klassen now lives in Los Angeles.

Every Friday, authors and KidLit bloggers post a favorite picture book. To see a complete listing of all the Perfect Picture Books (PPB) with resources, please visit author Susanna Leonard Hill’s website.
 
*Review copy provided by Candlewick Press in exchange for a review. 

I’m A Hare, So There! by Julie Rowan-Zoch

I’m A Hare, So There!

Julie Rowan-Zoch, Author Illustrator

Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, Fiction, Mar. 16, 2021

Suitable for Ages: 4-7

Themes: Hare, Animals, Similarities, Differences, Humor

Opening: “Hello, Rabbit.”… “Rabbit? Did you say…rabbit?”

Synopsis:

Rabbit? Did you say…rabbit?  I’m not a rabbit! I’m a hare, so there!

You may have heard that we hares can outrun turtles. Oh, wait — I mean tortoises…They are similar; but not the same. Still, we hares are speedy, and we can look out for ourselves.  Good thing, too, because you never know what you might come across in the desert…

Why I like this book:

This is a smart, witty and simple story about a feisty rabbit — I mean Hare — with attitude.  Readers of all ages will enjoy the author’s clever wordplay and jovial banter between Hare and Chipmunk — I mean ground squirrel — about the important differences between a hare and a rabbit.  Hares are born with hair. They are larger and have long ears and big feet. They change colors during the winter.

Children will find the author’s sense of humor hilarious, as they watch Hare jump all around the desert, oblivious to the fact he’s being tracked by a Jackal — I mean coyote. They will enjoy the repetition. It is a perfect read aloud for at home and school.

The text is spare and allows Julie Rowan-Zoch to showcase Hare’s story with exuberant and cheeky artwork against the desert backdrop. Hare’s facial expressions and body language really make this story! Kids will want to draw just like Julie!

Be sure to check out the backmatter. The book is educational and kids will learn in the “SIMILAR but not the same” section that there are significant differences between similar animals, like turtles and tortoises, frogs and toads, wasps and bees, and lizards and salamanders. And there is also a page where kids are asked to choose and place the animals that will most likely be able to survive in the desert.

Resources:  Have children draw pictures of Hare or any of the other desert animals. This story may also have other applications in real life. For instance, my adopted son is from India, but is frequently mistaken for other ethnicities. Many kids have beautiful names that students may not know how to pronounce correctly. These can be hurtful, in the same way Hare experiences being called a rabbit.

Julie Rowan-Zoch grew up collecting freckles and chasing hermit crabs in New York, and spent years slicing rich breads in Germany before waking up to 300 days of blue Colorado skies. If she doesn’t answer the door, look in the garden. She is also illustrated Louis, authored by Tom Lichtenheld. Visit her online at her website, and on Instagram at @jrzoch. 

Every Friday, authors and KidLit bloggers post a favorite picture book. To see a complete listing of all the Perfect Picture Books (PPB) with resources, please visit author Susanna Leonard Hill’s website.
 
*Reviewed from a purchased copy.

Louis by Tom Lichtenheld and Julie Rowan-Zoch

Louis

Tom Lichtenheld, Author

Julie Rowan-Zoch, Illustrator

HMH Books for Young Readers, Fiction, Oct. 6, 2020

Suitable for ages: 4-7

Themes: Boy, Teddy Bear, Underappreciated, Humor, Love

Opening: “From day one…things have gone downhill. I’ve been a pillow… a hankie…”

Book Jacket Synopsis:

Louis the bear has had enough. He feels overlooked and underappreciated.  If he’s not being used as a hankie, he’s being hung out to dry — literally. This teddy can BEAR it no longer, so he’s sneaking away just as soon as he can!

Then again, there’s no use running off in the rain. Or during show-and-tell. Or when there are delicious snacks to be had. Maybe Louis has something to lose, after all…

New York Times best-selling creator Tom Lichtenheld and newcomer Julie Rowan-Zoch’s hilarious peek into a teddy’s secret life is salty and sweet, grumpy and tender, and a heartfelt tribute to those we cherish.

Why I like this book:

Tom Lichtenheld’s Louis is packed with kid appeal! His text is spare, but delivers bear’s grumpy comments with humor and fun wordplay. Most children have a beloved Teddy Bear or favorite comfort animal they drag around and love to death. How clever to tell the story from the bear’s perspective. Children will giggle at his comments.  But they just may think about how they treat their own favorite bear. Golly, aren’t bears and comfort animals meant to be loved and squeezed to death — literally?  Louis is a fun read aloud at bedtime or in the classroom. Will bear ever have a change of heart?

Julie Rowan-Zoch’s colorful and expressive illustrations are a nod to children that this bear is upset and had enough! Bear’s body language is priceless — the look of utter disgust at having his paw used as a hankie, tightly closed eyes as he’s poked with needles, the dismay at being left on the school bus, and the frowns and forehead wrinkles.  Rowan-Zoch’s creative use of white space make each adorable illustration pop. Make sure you check out the end papers.

Resources: Draw a picture of your own bear or favorite stuffed animal. Name three things you love most about your bear. What are three things you like to do with your bear?  Do you think your bear get’s lonely?

Tom Lichtenheld might seem a little old to have a teddy bear, but he’s a kid at heart and I like hanging out in his studio. To pay him back for many years of free crayons, a warm bed, and chocolate-strawberry cupcakes, I decided to let him write a book about me. You can learn about his other  — less interesting — books by checking out his website.

Julie Rowan-Zoch grew up collecting freckles and chasing hermit crabs in New York, and spent years slicing rich breads in Germany before waking up to 300 days of blue Colorado skies. If she doesn’t answer the door, look in the garden! Visit Julie online at her website or on Instagram @jrzoch. She has authored and illustrated a debut picture book, I’m a Hare, So There!

Every Friday, authors and KidLit bloggers post a favorite picture book. To see a complete listing of all the Perfect Picture Books (PPB) with resources, please visit author Susanna Leonard Hill’s website.

*Reviewed from a purchased copy.

Don’t Call Me Fuzzybutt! by Robin Newman

Don’t Call Me Fuzzybutt!

Robin Newman, Author

Susan Batori, Illustrator

Sleeping Bear Press, Fiction, Mar. 15, 2021

Suitable for ages: 5-8

Themes: Bear, Woodpecker, Forest animals, Interpersonal relationships, Name-calling, Gossip, Humor

Opening: “Bear needed a lot of sleep. Two hundred and forty-three and a half days, to be precise. Anything less and he turned grizzly.”

Publisher’s Synopsis:

Bear is tired. The weather is getting cool and he’s ready for a nice long nap–he’s got earmuffs and a brand-new door to keep out the noise, plus a pair of fluffy bunny slippers. Meanwhile, real estate mogul Woodpecker finds his recent homes…missing. And he follows the trail of debris right to Bear’s new front door. When he “tap tap taps” to talk to Bear about it, the two engage in a feisty exchange of name-calling and gossip with the rest of their forest neighbors. Can they patch it up–literally–before Bear loses too much sleep?

Why I like this book:

Robin Newman’s Don’t Call Me Fuzzybutt!” is an irresistibly funny picture book.  Rich with Newman’s hilarious text and Susan Batori’s lively and expressive illustrations, Bear’s story shows children how hurtful name-calling can be and how important it is to compromise and apologize. Woodpecker’s exuberance plays off Bear’s grumpiness.  At the height of their confrontation, large illustrations brilliantly show Bear and Woodpecker’s anger — nose to beak!  The humor is spot-on and children will ROAR with laughter!

Newman has a distinct and clever voice as an author. She uses kid-pleasing sounds (GROWL SNARL, ROAR, PECK, PEST), repetition, witty wordplay and fun reiterations of butt.  Newman hit a home run with Don’t Call Me Fuzzybutt!  It’s her best picture book yet! Don’t Call Me Fuzzybutt! is an entertaining read-aloud for home or in the classroom. Make sure you watch the trailer below!

Resources: Engage children in a discussion about name-calling, using Bear and Woodpecker as examples. Ask kids if they’ve  ever called someone a name? Have they ever been called a name? How did it make them feel — mad, hurt, bullied, or surprised? Help children make a list of what they can do to stop name-calling. Encourage kids to draw a picture of their favorite scene in Don’t Call Me Fuzzybutt!

Robin Newman was raised in New York City and Paris where she was a practicing attorney and legal editor, but she now prefers to write about witches, mice, pigs, peacocks, bears and woodpeckers. She is the author of the popular chapter books Griswold and Wilcox Mystery series, and picture books No Peacocks! and Hilde Bitterpickles Needs Her Sleep. She lives in New York with her husband, son, goldfish, and two spoiled English Cocker Spaniels, and one French Bulldog. Visit her at her website.

Every Friday, authors and KidLit bloggers post a favorite picture book. To see a complete listing of all the Perfect Picture Books (PPB) with resources, please visit author Susanna Leonard Hill’s website.

*Review copy provided by the author is exchange for a review.

Egg or Eyeball? by Cece Bell

Egg of Eyeball?

Cece Bell, Author and Illustrator

Candlewick Press, Fiction, Mar. 8 2020

Pages: 72

Suitable for Ages: 5-8

Themes:  Animals, Humor, Cartoons

Book Jacket Synopsis:

Oh! Oh, oh, oh! Look what Brain found. Chick and Spot say it is an egg. Brain says it is an eyeball. Is it an egg or an eyeball? The inimitable Cece Bell is back with a second hilarious primer on good manners gone awry and arguments run amok. Perfectly pitched to kids just learning to read and loaded with verbal and visual comedy, this offbeat graphic story by a master of the genre builds to an exhilaratingly absurd surprise ending.

Why I like this book:

Silly…Silly…Silly!  Just what children will adore most about this book.  Brain is once again in a tug-a-war with Chick and Spot, over an eyeball he found. The entertaining banter and rising tension will keep kids giggling until the surprise ending.

There are four chapters in this graphic story. Kids will enjoy the hilarious cartoon-like appearance and easily make out the repetitive words and sentences in each bubble — a great way to help children sound out and remember new words. The book is an early chapter book and will help them transition to more challenging books.

Verdict: Egg or Eyeball? is a rollicking summer read!

Cece Bell is the author-illustrator of the Geisel Honor Books Chick and Brain: Smell My Foot! and Rabbit and Robot: The Sleepover, as well as the Newbery Honor Book El Deafo. She is also the creator of the Sock Monkey picture books and Chuck and Woodchuck. Cece Bell learned to read with Dick and Jane, and now she hopes children will learn to read with Chick and Brain. She lives in Virginia with her family.

Greg Pattridge hosts Marvelous Middle Grade Monday posts on his wonderful Always in the Middle website. Check out the link to see all of the wonderful reviews by KidLit bloggers and authors.

*Review copy provided by publisher in exchange for a review.

Fergus and Zeke and the Field Day Challenge by Kate Messner

Fergus and Zeke and the Field Day Challenge

Kate Messner, Author

Heather Ross, Illustrator

Candlewick Press, Fiction, Apr. 14, 2020

Pages: 51

Suitable for Ages: 5-8

Themes: Classroom pets, Mice, School, Field Day, Competition

Opening: Fergus and Zeke always had fun in Miss Maxwell’s room. They did everything the children did.

Book Jacket Synopsis:

Fergus and Zeke love being the class pets in Miss Maxwell’s classroom. From science experiments to art projects, they do everything the students do. But on Field Day, none of the events are the right size for the small mice — the limbo is too easy, the high jump is too hard, and kickball is absolutely terrifying! So Fergus and Zeke create their own Field Day Challenge, with mouse-size tug-of-war, acorn throwing, and Hula-Hooping.

After all the fun and exercise, it’s time to go back to the classroom — but Fergus and Zeke are locked out! Will they be able to use their new skills to get inside in time for ice pops?

Why I like this book:

Best friends, Fergus and Zeke, are back for another adventure that is packed with humor and a lot mouse power. This is Kate Messner’s third book in her fun-loving Fergus and Zeke chapter book series for children who are learning to read on their own.

Kids will enjoy the suspense of these miniature-sized atheletes who can’t wait for Field Day. And despite their size, they are determined to compete with their classmates and find a creative way to to keep up with the class races. They may not be able to scramble beneath the teacher’s big parachute, so they create their own by using a recycled plastic grocery bag.

There are four chapters in the book with happy, expressive and colorful illustrations on each page — good for a lot of giggles. Make sure you check out the first two books, Fergus and Zeke and Fergus and Zeke at the Science Fair.

Kate Messner is passionately curious and writes books for kids who wonder, too. A former teacher, she has written more than thirty picture books, chapter books, and novels for young readers. She lives on Lake Champlain with her family.

Greg Pattridge hosts Marvelous Middle Grade Monday posts on his wonderful Always in the Middle website. Check out the link to see all of the wonderful reviews by KidLit bloggers and authors.

*Review copy provided by the publisher in an exchange for a review.

Don’t Feed the Bear by Kathleen Doherty

Don’t Feed the Bear

Kathleen Doherty, Author

Chip Wass, Illustrator

Sterling Children’s Books, Fiction, 2018

Suitable for Ages: 3 and up

Themes: Bear, Park, Ranger, Feeding, Battle, Sharing, Friendship

Opening: “Bear loved when campers left him grub. Mac and cheese…carrot cake…meatball stew!”

Synopsis:

Bear had a perfectly great life…until Park Ranger put up a sign that read DON’T FEED THE BEAR.

Well, Bear isn’t about to let Park Ranger get away with claiming all the picnickers’ goodies for herself. Crafty Bear puts up a sign of his own and the battle for yummy grub is on! Each worthy (and hungry) competitor tries to persuade parkgoers to their side. At stake: delicious chow, like juicy burgers and cookies. Who will win this war of words?

Why I like this book:

Kathleen Doherty has penned a delightful and humorous story about a bear and a park ranger battling over the food left behind by parkgoers. Her text is simple and snappy and encourages children to read on their own. Doherty uses clever word play and words that are fun to read aloud to kids — SMACKITY! SMACK! WHOMP! and STOMPITY, STOMP, GRRRRRR!

The book theme can be translated into many real life situations like sibling squabbles over food, territory and possessions. Kids will learn about compromising and reconciliation. Somewhere the bear and ranger must meet. Perhaps they can become a team and work together.

Couple Doherty’s lively story with Chip Wass’s rip-roaring and cheerful cartoon-like illustrations, and kids will beg to read this story repeatedly at bedtime. Make sure you give kids enough time to study each page — it’s worth it! Who knows what they may add to the story. With summer fast approaching, this is a perfect read!

Resources: Time to pull out the paper, markers and crayons. Ask children who are the rooting for: Bear or Park Ranger. Let them choose a  favorite scene or encounter in the story and draw their own version. If they are focused on the many signs that Bear and Park Ranger post, ask them what they may want to add.

Kathleen Doherty is a reading specialist who has taught elementary school for over thirty years. She loves writing humorous stories and read aloud to kids — that is,  when she’s not having a scrumptious picnic and chowing down on s’mores.

Every Friday, authors and KidLit bloggers post a favorite picture book. To see a complete listing of all the Perfect Picture Books (PPB) with resources, please visit author Susanna Leonard Hill’s website.

How to Take Care of Your Dinosaur by Jason Cockcroft

How to Take Care of Your Dinosaur

Jason Cockcroft, Author-Illustrator

Nosy Crow, Fiction, 2019

Suitable for Ages: 2-5

Themes: Dinosaur, Pet, Owner’s Guide, Humor, Friendship Imagination

Opening: Congratulations on your new dinosaur! When you first meet him, you might find that he is surprisingly shy. But don’t worry. He’ll soon come out of his shell!

Book Jacket Synopsis:

Taking care of your very own dinosaur can be a bit tricky at first. But if you follow a few simple guidlines, like making sure he gets plenty of food and exercise and remembering to clean up his gigantic poop, you may find you’ve made a lifelong friend.

Why I like this book:

What a hoot! How to Take Care of Your Dinosaur is both utterly delightful and an imaginative picture book for young children. Which means kids will be tickled by all the things the boy must do to care for his gigantic pet — starting with a healthy breakfast and trying to figure out how a shovel BIG dinosaur poop into a wheel barrel.

The text is written like a manual for owning and taking care of a pet, which can easily be translated into a guide for any child thinking about getting a new dog, hampster or cat.

The illustrations are oversized, as is the large green dinosaur, with his short legs and long tail. Each page is packed with fun details that children will have a grand time exploring. My favorites include the boy’s dog’s reaction to meal times, the poop, bath time and bedtime. Hilarious! And, make sure you check out the funny end papers of the delivery man.

Resources: This is a great read aloud at home or school!  Let kid’s imaginations soar as you encourage them to draw a colorful picture of the dinosaur they might like to own. What color of dinosaur would they pick? What would they name their dinosaur? Where would their dinosaur live? Would they really want a dinosaur for a pet? Or would they prefer another animal for a pet like a crocodile, horse, giraffe, or elephant. Have fun with this book!

Jason Cockcroft was born in New Zealand and raised in England. He is the illustrator and author of more than forty books for children, and he illustrated U.K. covers for the last three books in the Harry Botter series. He’s very happy to live in Addingham, England, a beautiful city that sounds like church bells, smells like chocolate, and is invaded by Vikings all year round.

Every Friday, authors and KidLit bloggers post a favorite picture book. To see a complete listing of all the Perfect Picture Books (PPB) with resources, please visit author Susanna Leonard Hill’s website.

Timmy Failure: Mistakes Were Made by Stephan Pastis and a Book Giveaway

Book Giveaway 

Timmy Failure: Mistakes Were Made

Stephan Pastis, Author and Illustrator

Candlewick Entertainment, Media tie-in edition, Fiction, Mar. 3, 2020

Suitable for Ages: 8-12

Themes: Detective Agency, Mistakes, Failure, Self-Confidence, Comics

Book Jacket Synopsis:

My names is Failure. Timmy Failure.

I am the founder, president, and CEO of the best detective agency in town, probably the nation.

The book you are holding is a historical record or my life as a detective. It has been rigorously fact-checked. All the drawings in here are by me. I tried to get my business partner to do the illustrations, but they were not good.

This book, and my life, are the inspiration for a new movie, Timmy Failure: Mistakes Were Made. It can been viewed on Disney +. It’s true. Now, in addition to being the best detective in town, probably the nation, I am also a movie star. My greatness knows no bounds.

Why I like this book:

Cartoonist Stephan Pastis brings back his boastful and overly confident Timmy Failure in this hilarious specialbook for fans. Pastis’s comedic timing is brilliant. You’ll have to admit that 11-year-old Timmy is an adorable character who is clueless about his lack of skills and his failures, but lovable all the same. Then add his imaginary and lazy business partner, Total, a 1500-pound polar bear who spends most of his time gorging on trash, and what you end up with is Total Failure Inc.

The narrative is first person TIMMY and is witty, sarcastic and entertaining. His last name was once Fayleure, but someone changed it to Failure. He certainly lives up to his name.

“I am the soon-to-be head of multi-billion-dollar employer of thousands who made it big by adhering to one simple credo: Greatness.

I am a detective without peer.

A visionary without limits.

A pioneer of tomorrow who only challenge now is to remain humble.”

The truth is that Timmy is totally bored in school and his teacher’s and other students don’t understand him or his rich fantasy life, which leads him to a lot of trouble at school and home. Timmy is socially inept in his interactions with other characters — Weevil Bun, Rollo Tookus, and Jimmy Weber. And then there is his arch nemesis, Corrina Corrina (aka The Beast) who is smart, tutors other students and has her own successful detective agency. And Timmy does not lose a client to Corrinna Corrina. Fortunately for Timmy, he does have a mother and other adults who do care about him.

Readers won’t be disappointed in their unforgettable and favorite hero. He succeeds to fail at everything, but he does so with charm and pride. Pastis’s black and white comic illustrations adorn every page and will leave readers roaring with laughter. And the fact his unorthodox story of failure has elevated him to stardom, shows Timmy’s brand of detective work is heartwarming to his fans.

Resources:  You can’t fail to have fun at Timmy Failure’s website. Check it out!

Book Giveaway: In order to participate and win a copy of Timmy Failure: Mistakes Were Made, leave a comment below by April 26! Tell me if you’ve read the other books in the series and which one is your favorite. Or tell me if you are new to this series and would love a chance to win a copy. You must live with the US or Canada to participate.

Stephan Pastis is a New York Times best-selling adult author of Larry in Wonderland and Pearls Before Swine. Timmy Failure: Mistakes Were Made is his first book for young readers, and is followed by Timmy Failure: Now Look What You’ve Done and Timmy Failure: We Meet Again. He lives in northern California.

Greg Pattridge hosts Marvelous Middle Grade Monday posts on his wonderful Always in the Middle website. Check out the link to see all of the wonderful reviews by KidLit bloggers and authors.

*Review copy provided fee by the publisher in exchange for a review.