A Feel Better Book for Little Sports by Holly Brochmann and Leah Bowen

A Feel Better Book for Little Sports 

Holly Brochmann and Leah Bowen, Authors

Shirley Ng-Benitez, Illustrator

Magination Press, Fiction, Aug. 24, 2021

Suitable for ages: 2-5

Themes: Sportsmanship, Teamwork, Resilience, Fun, Rhyme

Opening: All over the world, / in all different places, / people of all ages, genders, and races… / Share a love for SPORTS — they’re so much fun! / Yippee! Hooray! / Your team has won!

Book Jacket Synopsis:

The acclaimed Feel Better Books for Little Kids series now offers an upbeat rhyming story that tackles the fun and the not-so-fun parts of sports: winning, losing, being a good sport, and even resilience. This is a helpful book for little ones who are just entering the world of competitive play, so that they can get the most out of their activities.

Why I like this book:

Brochmann and Bowen’s picture book  is a perfect read for young children who get involved in sports at an early age. What child doesn’t like to run, swim, dance, skateboard, and play soccer, baseball, football, and tennis?  Sports can be a BIG deal for a little child, especially if they have older siblings who are sport enthusiasts!

What I love about this book is that it focuses more on what sports do for children and not so much on winning — although that’s fun too. It brings kids together. It helps them exercise their body and brain and work on their coordination. It teaches kids respect and consideration for others, especially when they win and an opponent loses. This is a very balanced and important book for at home or school.

The rhyming text is snappy and Shirley Ng-Benitez illustrations are lively and colorful. The children represent a diverse group of sport enthusiasts and those who are differently-abled. 

Resources: The author offers an insightful Note to Parents and Caregivers at the end of the book with more information about ways to help kids get the most out of sports while they have fun learning.

Holly Brochmann  and Leah Bowen are sisters and co-athors. This is the sisters’ fourth book in the Feel Better Books for Little Kids series: For Little Tears, For Little Worriers, Little Poopers, and For Little Tempers. Leah is a licensed professional counselor and registered play therapist. Holly has a degree in journalism and has a career in public relations. Both sisters live in Texas. You can visit them at their website.

Every Friday, authors and KidLit bloggers post a favorite picture book. To see a complete listing of all the Perfect Picture Books (PPB) with resources, please visit author Susanna Leonard Hill’s website.

*Review copy provided by the publisher in exchange for a review.”

Too Shy to Say Hi by Shannon Anderson

Too Shy to Say Hi

Shannon Anderson, Author

Hiroe Nakata, Illustrator

Magination Press, Fiction, Mar. 9, 2021

Suitable for ages: 4-8

Themes: Bashfulness, Anxiety, School, Friendship, Rhyme 

Opening: My dog and I walk every day, just the two of us. We pass some kids out playing ball — “Let’s GO Barnabus.”

Synopsis:

School is coming up and Shelli really wants to be less shy. At home, she relates more to her bashful pet fish who hides in his cave than she does to her outgoing dog, who wants to greet everyone in sight. Even her parrot squawks a “Hi! Hiiii! Hello!” Shelli wants to make new friends and meet new people, but she is just too shy to say hi!

“When I am back at school next week / I want to give it a go! / Will someone want to play with me? / There’s only one way to know.”

Why I like this book

Shannon Anderson has written a charming and helpful book for children who are bashful or painfully shy. Her rhyming text is snappy and upbeat as Shelli takes itsy bitsy steps to prepare for her first day at school, like practicing waving and saying “hello” into a mirror, 

I like how Shelli realizes that her shyness interferes with her ability to make friends. There are no adults in the background encouraging her or giving her suggestions. She’s very introspective and bravely figures out how to step outside of her comfort zone and ask Lupita if she can sit next to her in the classroom and play together during recess.  

Shelli’s journey is supported by Hiroe Nakata’s expressive and lively illustrations. My favorite illustration is the look of surprise on Shelli’s face when she first speaks to Lupita. You can see how proud she is of herself and relieved that she made the effort.

Making new friends may be tough for children. This is a great read aloud book for parents and teachers to have on hand for kids who are anxious in social situations like school. 

Resources: There is a Readers Note for parents and teachers about ways to work with children who are very shy and not interacting with friends or participating in activities they would really enjoy. 

Shannon Anderson has taught first grade through college level and loves to write books for child and teachers. In 20019, Shannon was named one of the Top 10 Teachers who inspired The Today Show. She was named the JC Runyon Person of the Year for her work writing and speaking about social and emotional issues for kids. She lives in Indiana. Visit Shannon at her website,  on Facebook @AuthorShannonAnderson and Twitter @ShannonTeaches.

Every Friday, authors and KidLit bloggers post a favorite picture book. To see a complete listing of all the Perfect Picture Books (PPB) with resources, please visit author Susanna Leonard Hill’s website.
 
*Review copy provided by Magination Press in exchange for a review.

How Can I Wait When There’s a Treat on My Plate? by Dan Graham

How Can I Wait When There’s a Treat on My Plate?

Dan Graham, Author

Teresa Martinez, Illustrator

Magination Press, Fiction, May 25, 2021

Suitable for ages: 4-8

Themes:  Twin brothers, Temptation, Patience, Self-control, Rhyme

Opening: “No twins could be more similar, / no match quite so complete, / no sibling pair has more they share / than brothers Dell and Pete.”

Synopsis:

It’s hard for some kids to wait for something that they really want! A marshmallow now or ice cream later?

Twins Dell and Pete are alike in nearly every way. But when faced with a new sweet challenge, they discover a way they’re not so similar after all. Will they be able to resist the very first temptations that they see?

What to like about this book:

Dan Graham has written a charming story about self-control and patience. The rhyming makes it a a fun read aloud at school or home. All children will relate to Pete and Dell’s dilemma of having to choose between the gratification of an immediate sweet treat or waiting for an even better one later. 

Who doesn’t like a treat? The twins do! Pete is a lovable character who likes immediate gratification. He’s so tempted by an after school treat (marshmallow, gummy bugs etc.), that he forgets he’ll miss out on ice cream after tee-ball later. Dell, on the other hand, makes his choice and waits for the ice cream. When Pete shares his frustration and asks him how he can wait, Dell shares some of the strategies — cool tricks — he uses to deal with temptation: he walks away; he imagines gummy bugs and worms as alive; and he distracts himself by playing a game, drawing or reading. Readers will enjoy watching the the boys figure this out on their own, without the help of adults.

Teresa Martinez’s lively and colorful illustrations make this story a very entertaining read.  The characters’ expressions are perfect!

Resources: The book is a resource. But make sure  you check out the Reader’s Note at the back of the book. 

Dan Graham, PhD, is a faculty member in applied social and health psychology at Colorado State University. His research focuses on promoting healthy eating and physical activity. You can follow him on Twitter @dangrahambooks.

Every Friday, authors and KidLit bloggers post a favorite picture book. To see a complete listing of all the Perfect Picture Books (PPB) with resources, please visit author Susanna Leonard Hill’s website.
 
*Review copy provided by Magination Press in exchange for a review. 

The Not-So-Scary Dog by Alanna Propst

Alanna Propst, Author

Michelle Simpson, Illustrator

Magination Press, Fiction, Mar. 30, 2021

Suitable for Ages: 4 – 8

Themes: Dogs, Anxiety, Fear, Exposure therapy, Rhyme

Opening: “Oh Tommy, you’ve got mail, it’s from Joey down the street. An invite to his birthday bash, it sounds like such a treat!” 

Publisher’s Synopsis:

Eight feet tall and with teeth like swords! 

When Tommy is invited to a birthday party, he’s excited until he remembers his friend Joey has a big hairy dog that slobbers and barks a lot. Tommy is afraid of dogs and tells his mom he is too scared to go.  His mother shares her fear of dogs as a child and reassures Tommy that they will come up with a plan and take slow steps to help him overcome his fear. With her help, Tommy slowly learns to overcome his fear through exposure therapy. Together, they take small steps to get him comfortable with dogs, starting with pictures of cute little puppies and working through steps to eventually pet a big dog all on his own so that he will feel comfortable going to his friend’s birthday party.

Why I like this book:

Alanna Propst’s delightful rhyming picture book will be a welcomed addition to any home or school library.  The Not-So-Scary Dog will help children deal with just about any fear or phobia — animals reptiles, swimming, starting school, going to the doctor/dentist, riding in an elevator, or monsters under the bed.  They won’t avoid fun activities, sit on the sidelines and miss-out on the fun. Kids have active imaginations and Tommy’s are a bit exaggerated to make point of how fears grow over time. 

I remember my fear of certain dogs (Boxers and German Shepherds) as a child. I was bitten on my fanny when I was very young. It took years for me to overcome my fear of these two breeds. And I had a fear of snakes, although it didn’t stop me from running through cornfields and playing in the creeks. What were you afraid of as a child? Leave your answer in the comments section.

Michelle Simpson’s brightly colored illustrations showcase Tommy’s big imagination about big scary dogs. As the story progresses, her beautiful artwork is expressive and playful and compliments the story.

Resources: There is an excellent Reader’s Note at the end of the book that talks about exposure therapy and it’s many uses and benefits. There are suggestions and activities for parents and teachers to use with kids. There is also a series of questions to ask kids about the book to get them talking about Tommy’s fear. This will lead to kids talking about their fears. Share your own fears so your child doesn’t feel so alone or ashamed.  How did you overcame your fear? 

Alanna J. Propst is a psychiatrist who graduated from McGill University in both the Psychiatry Residency Program as well as the Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Subspecialty Program, and has worked in inpatient, outpatient and emergency room settings. This is her debut picture books. She live in Montreal, Canada.

Every Friday, authors and KidLit bloggers post a favorite picture book. To see a complete listing of all the Perfect Picture Books (PPB) with resources, please visit author Susanna Leonard Hill’s website.
 
*Review copy provided by Magination Press in exchange for a review.

Sumo Joe by Mia Wenjen

Multicultural Children’s Book Day, Jan. 31, 2020

#ReadYourWorld

Sumo Joe

Mia Wenjen, Author

Nat Iwata, Illustrator

Lee & Low Books, Fiction, Jun 11, 2019

Suitable for Ages: 4-7

Themes: Sumo, Aikido, Wrestling, Martial Art Forms, Rhyme, Multicultural

Opening: Get up early, have to hurry. / Sumo Joe.

Synopsis:

On Saturday mornings, Sumo Joe is a gentle big brother to his little sister. But on Saturday afternoons, he and his friends are sumo wrestlers! They tie on make-shift mawashi belts, practice drills such as teppo, and compete in their homemade ring. They even observe sumo’s ultimate rule: no girlsl allowed! But when Sumo Joe’s sister wants to join the fun, Sumo Joe is torn between the two things he’s best at: sumo, and being a big brother.

Why I like this book:

Mia Wenjen’s debut book, Sumo Joe, is an original, lively and heartwarming multicultural story about sibling relationships and martial arts for children. I knew little about sumo wrestlers, so I enjoyed learning about this ancient Japanese sport.

The rhyming text is clever and simple enough for children to read on their own. Nat Iwata’s big colorful illustrations are perfect for Sumo Joe. They are bold, expressive and humorous. They show the bond between the siblings, as well as the competitiveness.

Sumo Joe is gentle and kind. His determined sister, Aikido Jo, uses her training in aikido to take on her brother in the sacred ring, even though “no girls” are allowed.  And you will have to read the book to find out what happens with his spitfire little sister, who has some moves of her own.

Readers will learn about wrestling, blessing the makeshift ring of pillows with sacred salt, sumo techniques and the traditional apparel – black  mawashi belts.

Resources: Make sure you check out the Author’s Note about the sport of sumo wrestling. There is a Glossary of terms about sumo wrestling moves. Visit Wenjen’s page for Sumo activities. Also check out Lee & Low’s Teacher Guide.

Note: Mia Wenjen would love to do Skype visits with school classrooms. Her visits are free. Please email her at pragmaticmomblog@gmail.com if you would like to arrange a visit.

Mia Wenjen is an entrepreneur, children’s author and a blogger at Pragmatic Mom, a popular online resource for parents and educators. As the cofounder of Multicultural Children’s Book Day, Mia is passionate about diverse representation in children’s picture books.

Every Friday, authors and KidLit bloggers post a favorite picture book. To see a complete listing of all the Perfect Picture Books (PPB) with resources, please visit author Susanna Leonard Hill’s website.
*Review copy provided by the author.

Multicultural Children’s Book Day 2020 (1/31/20) is in its 7th year! This non-profit children’s literacy initiative was founded by Valarie Budayr and Mia Wenjen; two diverse book-loving moms who saw a need to shine the spotlight on all of the multicultural books and authors on the market while also working to get those book into the hands of young readers and educators.

Seven years in, MCBD’s mission is to raise awareness of the ongoing need to include kids’ books that celebrate diversity in homes and school bookshelves continues.

MCBD 2020  is honored to have the following Medallion Sponsors on board

 Super Platinum

Make A Way Media/ Deirdre “DeeDee” Cummings,

Platinum

Language Lizard, Pack-N-Go Girls,

Gold

Audrey Press, Lerner Publishing Group, KidLit TV, ABDO BOOKS : A Family of Educational Publishers, PragmaticMom & Sumo Jo, Candlewick Press,

Silver

Author Charlotte Riggle, Capstone Publishing, Guba Publishing, Melissa Munro Boyd & B is for Breathe,

Bronze

Author Carole P. Roman, Snowflake Stories/Jill Barletti, Vivian Kirkfield & Making Their Voices Heard. Barnes Brothers Books,  TimTimTom, Wisdom Tales Press, Lee & Low Books,  Charlesbridge Publishing, Barefoot Books Talegari Tales

Author Sponsor Link Cloud

Jerry Craft, A.R. Bey and Adventures in Boogieland, Eugina Chu & Brandon goes to Beijing, Kenneth Braswell & Fathers Incorporated, Maritza M. Mejia & Luz del mes_Mejia, Kathleen Burkinshaw & The Last Cherry Blossom, SISSY GOES TINY by Rebecca Flansburg and B.A. Norrgard, Josh Funk and HOW TO CODE A ROLLERCOASTER, Maya/Neel Adventures with Culture GrooveLauren Ranalli, The Little Green Monster: Cancer Magic! By Dr. Sharon Chappell, Phe Lang and Me On The Page, Afsaneh Moradian and Jamie is Jamie, Valerie Williams-Sanchez and Valorena Publishing, TUMBLE CREEK PRESS, Nancy Tupper Ling, Author Gwen Jackson, Angeliki Pedersen & The Secrets Hidden Beneath the Palm Tree, Author Kimberly Gordon Biddle, BEST #OWNVOICES CHILDREN’S BOOKS: My Favorite Diversity Books for Kids Ages 1-12 by Mia Wenjen, Susan Schaefer Bernardo & Illustrator Courtenay Fletcher (Founders of Inner Flower Child Books), Ann Morris & Do It Again!/¡Otra Vez!, Janet Balletta and Mermaids on a Mission to Save the Ocean, Evelyn Sanchez-Toledo & Bruna Bailando por el Mundo\ Dancing Around the World, Shoumi Sen & From The Toddler Diaries, Sarah Jamila Stevenson, Tonya Duncan and the Sophie Washington Book Series, Teresa Robeson  & The Queen of Physics, Nadishka Aloysius and Roo The Little Red TukTuk, Girlfriends Book Club Baltimore & Stories by the Girlfriends Book Club, Finding My Way Books, Diana Huang & Intrepids, Five Enchanted Mermaids, Elizabeth Godley and Ribbon’s Traveling Castle, Anna Olswanger and Greenhorn, Danielle Wallace & My Big Brother Troy, Jocelyn Francisco and Little Yellow Jeepney, Mariana Llanos & Kutu, the Tiny Inca Princess/La Ñusta Diminuta, Sara Arnold & The Big Buna Bash, Roddie Simmons & Race 2 Rio, DuEwa Frazier & Alice’s Musical Debut, Veronica Appleton & the Journey to Appleville book series  Green Kids Club, Inc.

We’d like to also give a shout-out to MCBD’s impressive CoHost Team who not only hosts the book review link-up on celebration day, but who also works tirelessly to spread the word of this event. View our CoHosts HERE.

Co-Hosts and Global Co-Hosts

Crafty Arab, Afsaneh Moradian, Agatha Rodi Books, All Done Monkey, Barefoot Mommy, Bethany Edward & Biracial Bookworms, Michelle Goetzl & Books My Kids Read, Crafty Moms Share, Colours of Us, Discovering the World Through My Son’s Eyes, Educators Spin on it, Shauna Hibbitts-creator of eNannylink, Growing Book by Book, Here Wee Read, Joel Leonidas & Descendant of Poseidon Reads {Philippines}, Imagination Soup, Kid World Citizen, Kristi’s Book Nook, The Logonauts, Mama Smiles, Miss Panda Chinese, Multicultural Kid Blogs, Serge Smagarinsky {Australia}, Shoumi Sen, Jennifer Brunk & Spanish Playground, Katie Meadows and Youth Lit Reviews

FREE RESOURCES from Multicultural Children’s Book Day

TWITTER PARTY! Register here

The Twitter Party is Jan. 31, 2020 from 9 pm to 10 pm. ET. Follow the twitter  #ReadYourWorld hashtag to join and win.

Hashtag: Don’t forget to connect with us on social media and be sure and look for/use our official hashtag #ReadYourWorld.

The Night Before the Fourth of July by Natasha Wing

The Night Before the Fourth of July

Natasha Wing, Author

Amy Wummer, Illustrator

Grosset & Dunlap, Fiction, 2015

Suitable for Ages: 3-5

Themes: Independence Day, Celebration, Fireworks, Family

Synopsis: It’s the night before the Fourth of July and all across the United States people are getting ready for hot dogs and fireworks. Decked in red, white, and blue, a family heads to a parade, hosts a backyard BBQ with friends and family, dodges an afternoon thundershower, and of course, watches a fireworks show. The Night Before the Fourth of July captures all the fun, excitement, and pride of the best summer holiday!

Natasha Wing brings all the excitement and fun to life in the pages of this celebration of our nation’s history. The rhyming is fun and playful.  Amy Wummer’s illustrations are lively and colorful. This is the perfect book to introduce young children ages 3-5, to our joyful American birthday party, emphasizing family, diversity and tradition. This is the 20th book in “The Night Before…” series. Collect them all!

Resources: What are you going to do on the Fourth of July? Will you dress-up, attend a parade, go to a family picnic, and watch fireworks? Will you wave a flag? Adults will find the book will bring back a flood of  childhood memories they can share with their children.

Natasha Wing is the author of When Jackie Saved Grand Central: The True Story of Jacqueline Kennedy’s Fight for an American Icon, 2017. She has written nearly 25 books in her “The Night Before…” series which deal with Easter, Christmas, Father’s Day, Preschool, Summer Camp, Kindergarten and many more delightful holidays and celebrations. She was born in Connecticut and now lives in Fort Collins, Colorado. After graduating from Arizona State University, she worked in advertising. It wasn’t until 1991 that she decided to write children’s books. Luckily she sold her first book within six months and has been writing children’s books and articles ever since.  Visit Natasha at her website.

Every Friday, authors and KidLit bloggers post a favorite picture book. To see a complete listing of all the Perfect Picture Books (PPB) with resources, please visit author Susanna Leonard Hill’s website.

The Big Adventures of Tiny House by Susan Schaefer Bernardo

The Big Adventures of Tiny House

Susan Schaefer Bernardo, Author

Courtenay Fletcher, Illustrator

Inner Flower Child Books, Fiction, Apr. 25, 2017

Suitable for Ages: 4-8

Themes: Tiny Houses, Salvaged, Recycled, Travel, Home, Community

Opening: Once there was a farmhouse in a field of hay, / but while it lay sleeping, the acres gave way / to a bustling city whose bright, shiny towers / edged out the farmhouse, the fields and flowers.

Synopsis: An old farmhouse finds its once peaceful setting surrounded by a big city. People pitch in and dismantle the house, salvage the windows and doors, and build a Tiny House on wheels. It has a tiny front porch, a kitchen with cabinets, a loft for sleeping and a nook for reading. When Tiny is hooked up to Big Truck they can travel where ever they want. Tiny heads west to see the world and discover if he’s a real home.

They drive past farmlands, visit the big silver arch in St. Louis, join a parade in New Orleans, camp near the Grand Canyon, drive through the desert and wind through the Rocky Mountains. Traveling can be fun, but Tiny becomes lonely.  They meet friends like Shiny (an Airstream) and Buster (a converted school bus) who invite Tiny to the Tiny House Jamboree. Back on the road Tiny discovers Harmony, a village of tiny houses, and learns a very important lessons about the meaning of home.

Illustrations Courtesy of Courtenay Fletcher

Why I like this book:

Susan Schaefer Bernardo and Courtenay Fletcher have outdone themselves with The Big Adventures of Tiny House, which captures the spirit and heart of the tiny house movement in America. Tiny homes and communities offer an alternative for those seeking a simpler and less costly lifestyle change, friendship and community. And yes, there is a big annual jamboree.

There is a lot energy and playfulness in Bernardo’s rhyming text. “If you’re looking for adventure, just follow me / to the axle-hoppin’, wheel-stompin’ Tiny House Jamboree. / We’ll raise the roof with our ruckus! All our kin will be coming! / There’ll be ringing and singing and dancing and drumming!” The story has a rhythm to it and is fun to read out loud along with the “Beep! Beep! Honk! Honk!” The pacing is perfect and the storytelling is clever. The ending is satisfying and carries a very important message for children about the meaning of “home.”

There is a richness and charm in Fletcher’s bold and colorful illustrations that make this a beautiful book to read. If you look real closely at all the illustrations, kids will discover eyes peering out the windows as Tiny rolls along the road, celebrates the jamboree or is content in his new community. The author and illustrator team up to once again produce another winning book for children.

Resources: Have kids draw or design their own tiny house. What would they put inside the their house? How big would they make it? The Tiny House website also has a template of a tiny house that kids can construct and coloring pages.

Susan Schafer Bernardo and Courtney Fletcher have collaborated on Sun Kisses and Moon Hugs and  The Rhino Who Swallowed a Storm, which was read aloud by First Lady Michelle Obama and sent to the International Space Station as part of Storytime in Space!  They hope that Tiny Makes his dream come true and finds his ways to Mars.

Every Friday, authors and KidLit bloggers share a favorite picture book. To see a complete listing of all the Perfect Picture Books with resources, please visit author Susanna Leonard Hill’s Perfect Picture Books.

*I was provided with a copy of  The Big Adventures of Tiny House in exchange for a fair and honest review.

Stickley Makes a Mistake! by Brenda S. Miles

stickley-makes-a-mistake51jrzhny88l__sx401_bo1204203200_Stickley Makes a Mistake! – A Frog’s Guide to Trying Again

Brenda S. Miles, Author

Steve Mack, Illustrator

Magination Press, Fiction, Aug. 15, 2016

Suitable for Ages: 5-8

Themes: Frogs, Animals, Making mistakes, Perfection, Perseverance, Rhyme

Opening: When Stickley was young, he didn’t like making mistakes. “Oh no!” he’d say, and he wouldn’t try again. He wanted to be perfect.

Book Synopsis: Stickley didn’t like making mistakes. With help from his Grandpa, Stickley learns to hop up, try again, and say “oh well” when he makes a mistake. Nobody’s perfect, and good things can happen even when you make mistakes — like putting blueberries in the pancake batter instead of chocolate chips. When Stickley writes 1 + 1 = 3 on the blackboard, he asks for help and a polar bear hands him an ice cream cone with two sweet scoops.

Why I like this book:

Brenda S. Mills’ has written a charming and important sequel to her popular Stickley Sticks To It book. Stickley is so afraid of making a mistake, that he’s afraid to try when he messes up. It is important for children to learn that making a mistake is part of their learning process.  They grow from their mistakes. And, some mistakes can be fun. The language is artful, with a careful use of prose that is also lyrical at times.  “No one is perfect, / so practice your best! / If you’re stuck on a problem, / ask for help with the rest!”  Steve Mack’s illustrations are colorful, lively and full of personality. Stickley’s expressions are priceless.

Resources: The book includes a Note to Parents, Caregivers, and Teachers with tips for helping children to embrace their mistakes, learn from them, and keep trying. Stickley Makes a Mistake, is an important book for preschools and elementary students.  This is a good book to read at the start of the new year, to help children know that perfection isn’t the goal — the fun of learning.  And since many parents don’t like making mistakes, it’s a fun book to read with your child.  It will encourage many fun discussions.

Every Friday, authors and KidLit bloggers post a favorite picture book. To see a complete listing of all the Perfect Picture Books (PPB) with resources, please visit author Susanna Leonard Hill’s Perfect Picture Books.

Before Morning by Joyce Sidman

before-morning-61plgsa6lwl__sx379_bo1204203200_Before Morning

Joyce Sidman, Author and Poet

Beth Krommes, Illustrator

Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, Fiction, Oct. 4, 2016

Suitable for Ages: 4-7

Themes: City and town life, A child’s wish, Snow, Rhyme

Book Jacket Synopsis: There are planes to fly and buses to catch, but a small child wishes for a different sort of day. As clouds gather and heavy flakes fall, her invocation rises above the sleeping city. A too-busy world falls silent, and a family revels in the freedom and peace that snow brings.

Why I like this book:

Joyce Sidman’s breathtaking book is pure poetry for children and the young at heart. The text is spare and there are many wordless pages. It is a quiet story to curl up with, read slowly and study the detail on each page. There are busy scenes of people walking in parks, striding past shops, pushing strollers and riding buses. There are children arriving home from school, families eating together, and parents leaving for work. And there is a child who wishes for snow. Beth Krommes’ beautiful scratch-board artwork is a feast for the eyes.  The words and artwork perfectly support the theme.

Resources:  Make sure you read the author’s thought-provoking comment “On Wishes and Invocations” at the end of the book. Ask children what they wish for. Do their words have power?

Joyce Sidman won a Newbery Honor for her Dark Emperor and Other Poems of the Night. She is today’s foremost nature poet for children. Two of her other books are Caldecott Honor books. She won the Award for Excellence in Poetry for Children for her award-winning body of work.

Beth Krommes is the Caldecott-winning artist of The House in the Night and other beautiful picture books, including Butterfly Eyes and Other Secrets of the Meadow, and Blue on Blue.

Every Friday, authors and KidLit bloggers post a favorite picture book. To see a complete listing of all the Perfect Picture Books (PPB) with resources, please visit author Susanna Leonard Hill’s Perfect Picture Books.

Move Your Mood!

Move Mood 51yBzV7KVTL__SX401_BO1,204,203,200_Move Your Mood!

Brenda S. Miles and Colleen A. Patterson, Authors

Holly Clifton-Brown, Illustrator

Magination Press, Fiction, Apr. 18, 2016

Suitable for Ages: 3-6

Themes: Learning about emotions, Mood, Movement, Animals, Rhyme

Opening: “Feeling blah? Here’s what to do. MOVE YOUR BODY and your mood moves too!”

Book Jacket Synopsis: Move Your Mood! encourages children to twist, wiggle, hop, march, shake and smile their way into a better mood. 

Why I like this book:

Brenda S. Miles and Colleen A. Patterson have written a fresh and clever story that teaches children to move their bodies when they feel angry, sad, worried, anxious and frustrated. What a great way to boost their moods.

Adorable anthropomorphic animals (cow, giraffe, pig, elephant, kangaroo and duck etc.) wearing stylish hats dance, waddle, hop, twist, wiggle, and march across double-page spreads to the delight of young readers. The text is simple: “Twist out tired! Twist. Twist. Twist.” and “Wiggle out worried! Wiggle like this!” Holly Clifton-Brown’s humorous illustrations are colorful, lively, and expressive.

Verdict: This book will elicit many giggles from children, who will feel energized and happy after doing all the suggested movements before they sit down to focus on an activity. This book is a winner for kids, parents and teachers!

Resources: There is a Note to Parents, Caregivers, and Teachers at the end of the book with suggestions in how to use this book at home in the morning to start the day, at school during circle time and in the afternoon to re-energize and refocus students. This is such an uplifting and terrific resource to use with preschoolers and kindergarteners.

Every Friday, authors and KidLit bloggers post a favorite picture book. To see a complete listing of all the Perfect Picture Books (PPB) with resources, please visit author Susanna Leonard Hill’s Perfect Picture Books.